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Japan Robotics Hardware

Android Copy of Danish Man Unveiled 147

Posted by timothy
from the filled-with-chese dept.
An anonymous reader writes "The Geminoid family, a series of ultra-realistic androids, each a copy of a real person, has a new member: Geminoid DK, a robot clone of a Danish researcher and the most realistic Geminoid yet. The robot has lifelike facial features and movements, blinking, smiling, frowning with incredible realism. The Danish researcher, Henrik Scharfe of Aalborg University, teamed up with Japanese animatronics firm Kokoro and roboticist Hiroshi Ishiguro to create his robot twin, which he plans to use to study human-robot interaction and cultural differences in the perception of robots. This is the first Geminoid that is not based on a Japanese person; it's also the first bearded one."
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Android Copy of Danish Man Unveiled

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  • Re:!ultra (Score:5, Interesting)

    by HungryHobo (1314109) on Monday March 07, 2011 @05:22AM (#35403692)

    surprisingly enough many people are almost the opposite.

    If you get too far into the uncanny vally people can be hostile but stay well back and people will relate to machines just fine, they won't relate to them as people but they'll be fine thinking of them like really smart pets/animals.

    I came across a lovely article a while back.

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/05/05/AR2007050501009_pf.html [washingtonpost.com]

    People are quite ready to treat machines as they would animals, even going so far as to consider something that's happening to a bot to be inhumane.

    "The most effective way to find and destroy a land mine is to step on it.

    This has bad results, of course, if you're a human. But not so much if you're a robot and have as many legs as a centipede sticking out from your body. That's why Mark Tilden, a robotics physicist at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, built something like that. At the Yuma Test Grounds in Arizona, the autonomous robot, 5 feet long and modeled on a stick-insect, strutted out for a live-fire test and worked beautifully, he says. Every time it found a mine, blew it up and lost a limb, it picked itself up and readjusted to move forward on its remaining legs, continuing to clear a path through the minefield.

    Finally it was down to one leg. Still, it pulled itself forward. Tilden was ecstatic. The machine was working splendidly.

    The human in command of the exercise, however -- an Army colonel -- blew a fuse.

    The colonel ordered the test stopped.

    Why? asked Tilden. What's wrong?

    The colonel just could not stand the pathos of watching the burned, scarred and crippled machine drag itself forward on its last leg.

    This test, he charged, was inhumane. "

    It might be easier to get people to bond to a machine as they would a guidedog rather than as they would to another human.

    The veteran explosives technician looming over Bogosh was visibly upset. He insisted he did not want a new robot. He wanted Scooby-Doo back.

    "Sometimes they get a little emotional over it," Bogosh says. "Like having a pet dog. It attacks the IEDs, comes back, and attacks again. It becomes part of the team, gets a name. They get upset when anything happens to one of the team. They identify with the little robot quickly. They count on it a lot in a mission."

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