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Best Buy Offers Bogus "3D Sync" Service 248

Posted by timothy
from the this-way-to-the-egress dept.
Token_Internet_Girl writes "Fewer than two weeks after Best Buy offered the first Full 3D HDTVs for sale in the US, its latest Sunday circular (3/21/10) promotes a Samsung 3D TV deal consisting of a 55" 3D TV, 3D capable Blu-ray player, 2 pairs of glasses, a Blu-ray movie and Geek Squad delivery and installation. The ad states the service includes TV and Blu-ray player set-up, connection to your wireless network and 'sync your 3D glasses for an amazing experience.' The package price lists the 'geek' services as a $150 value. The offer's only problem is that there is no such thing as syncing 3D glasses. They sync automatically." Here's Best Buy Corporate's response to this hilarity.
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Best Buy Offers Bogus "3D Sync" Service

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  • by LostCluster (625375) * on Wednesday March 24, 2010 @06:00PM (#31604410)

    I don't think this was a deliberate attempt to defraud customers as much as it was a poor choice of verb. People use the term "sync" when it has nothing to do with synchronization. When you "sync" your smartphone you're not doing anything that relates to time, you're just copying data to be the same in both places. When you "sync" your Bluetooth headset, you're actually "pairing" it to tell it which phone it belongs to. When you press the "sync" button on your keyboard, you're actually "pairing" it again.

    While you don't need to set a clock on the 3D glasses, you do need to ensure that the glasses can see the IR emitter, with a clear path between the emitter and wherever the user will be sitting. That's the actual service they're offering as part of the larger setup package. I'm sure the advertising people will hear this brushback and correct future mentions of the service, but they're only technically wrong, and using words that better communicate to the people who would buy a Best Buy home install than the technically correct ones... even if technically correct is the best kind of correct.

    • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 24, 2010 @06:15PM (#31604618)

      Erm, so you're saying that actually they're not doing anything wrong, because this is a legitimate service they're offering - i.e. charging $150 to tell people they need a clear view of the TV to use their glasses to... watch the TV. I'm pretty sure that people will already figure out they need to see the TV to watch it, 3D or not, is your post sponsored by BestBuy or are you hoping to cash in by offering a $99 service?

      • by dangitman (862676) on Wednesday March 24, 2010 @06:29PM (#31604780)

        Erm, so you're saying that actually they're not doing anything wrong, because this is a legitimate service they're offering - i.e. charging $150 to tell people they need a clear view of the TV to use their glasses to... watch the TV.

        The $150 isn't just for the "sync glasses" service, it's primarily for delivery and installation of the TV.

      • by JWSmythe (446288)

        Judging from customers I've met, I think you've severely overestimated the intelligence of the average consumer. If you say you've never had a call from someone complaining that their TV doesn't work, just to find out that they didn't know to hit the big red "power" button.

        It's the same reason I don't answer my phone some days. "My internet doesn't work.", just to find out the powers out in the whole house. Of course, it doesn't help that when they call the power company and

    • by PsychoSlashDot (207849) on Wednesday March 24, 2010 @06:15PM (#31604622)

      Agreed. There are plenty of instances where dumbing-down technical descriptions of what us technology-savvy folk are doing edges into falsehood. Sometimes to explain things to the uninformed you have to condense to the point of being easily misunderstood by others in-the-know.

      The consumer will interpret that "syncing" thing as "doing whatever techno-wizardry is necessary to make sure the purchased stuff Just Works (tm)". The technician will basically test for DOA, or make whatever minor adjustments (ie. take off the packing foam) are needed. Syncing. Good enough.

      No sign of intent to mislead or defraud. Alarmism.

      • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 24, 2010 @06:25PM (#31604738)

        If it's not a conspiracy then there's no story, and if there's no story, then why are you here?

        Now put your tinfoil hat back on and get in line with the rest of us!
        We were promised cake if we just stand on this moving walkway.

      • by hrimhari (1241292) on Wednesday March 24, 2010 @06:53PM (#31605014) Journal

        Hold on, I'll be right back after I sync my mug with the coffee machine.

      • by srleffler (721400) on Wednesday March 24, 2010 @07:02PM (#31605092)
        Well, only the usual attempt to mislead that underlies most marketing. By using words that make the process sound more technical, they help convince naive buyers that they need this service. A more honest description of the services offered would probably inspire slightly fewer people to buy it. Hence, the attempt to mislead is intentional, but not especially severe.
        • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

          by bane2571 (1024309)
          I'd probably end up paying $150 to get a whitegoods shop to deliver and install my Fridge, if they "sync it to my microwave" what does it mattter? I'm still getting the delivery and installation.

          People are blowing this up from a standard delivery charge with some poorly chosen addtional BS to a charge for turning on your TV. Are we really that petty?
      • by sjames (1099) on Wednesday March 24, 2010 @09:28PM (#31606298) Homepage

        There is clearly an intent to mislead. Using the term "sync" rather than "unpack it and make sure it works" is clearly intended to make it sound like something you can't do yourself because you're not a 3D TV geek. The idea is to inflate the perceived value of the unpacking and turning on service.

      • by Minwee (522556) <dcr@neverwhen.org> on Wednesday March 24, 2010 @10:16PM (#31606598) Homepage

        No sign of intent to mislead or defraud.

        From Best Buy? That is an alarming development. I don't think I have ever had an experience with that chain which didn't involve either of those value added services.

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by Anonymous Coward

        They made something up to scare people into buying their service. If someone already knows how to install an HDTV, they won't buy the $150 installation service.

        But if you tell them that their new 3D TV needs to be 'synced' by the Geek Squad, they may think that something fundamentally different is needed and they better buy the service.

        It's fraud, plain and simple. Seeing as the blogger called up three different Best Buys and got three different incorrect answers as to what the syncing was, I feel comfort

    • by cant_get_a_good_nick (172131) on Wednesday March 24, 2010 @06:16PM (#31604632)

      Maybe, if this was an isolated incident with Best Buy. But a quick search on Best Buy, Geek Squad, and Ripoff will get quite a few hits. I'd love to give someone the benefit of the doubt, but this is a bit of a pattern with them.

      The margins on selling electronics are painfully thin (ask CircuitCity). Creating a misleading "oh but that's not how we meant it" as they sell low value for the money services is a common thread for electronics retailers.

    • by twidarkling (1537077) on Wednesday March 24, 2010 @06:17PM (#31604648)

      Syncronization doesn't simply mean making things have the same time. It also means to make things *happen* at the same time. In this case, I'd assumed their "syncing" service to be making sure your glasses are properly shuttering in "sync" with how the player is broadcasting. Something that should happen automatically, and apparently does. And since the glasses are tied to the TV, they're paired automatically as well. It's not a case of "incorrect verb," it's a case of "falsely reporting what the service offers."

      They don't need to pair the glasses, they don't need to make sure the glasses are operating at the correct timings. It's a rip off.

    • by 0racle (667029) on Wednesday March 24, 2010 @06:19PM (#31604670)
      No, I think it was a deliberate attempt to mislead. Best Buy already offers installation services on devices they sell, and by Best Buys response pretty much states that is exactly what this, just under a different name. 3d TV's are new, but TV's in general are not. Honestly any idiot can install a TV and home theater in a box and more people are realizing this and as such Best Buy is probably worrying that they are going to have a harder and harder time selling the essentially free money installation services. So they rename an existing service to make it sound like they are doing something special, that a trained professional is required for, that is essential for the enjoyment of the TV.
    • by blindedbyvision (822004) <blindedbyvisionNO@SPAMgmail.com> on Wednesday March 24, 2010 @06:23PM (#31604720) Homepage

      Read the article not just the blurb....

      "HD Guru called three Best Buy stores. After confirming each employee received training on 3D TVs and installation services, we asked them to explain the process of “syncing” the 3D glasses. We received three different but oddly similar responses.

      Blue shirt one said the glasses need to be synced with the Blu-ray player. The second geek referred to the 3D glasses needing to sync to the player via the USB port within the glasses, an impossible feat as there is no USB port on the glasses. The third stated the need to acquire the glasses’ IP address to sync with the Blu-ray player. There is no IP address for 3D glasses; they have no connectivity to the Internet or network. The Samsung battery powered glasses “sync” to the 3D content wirelessly via an infra-red pulse emitted by the TV."

      Best Buy has a consistent record of the same issue. How you choose to look at it is one of three things. 1. Their "experts" are worthless and don't know anything, 2. They are intentional trying to defraud consumers, or 3, they assume consumers are all retarded and wouldn't understand something explained to them in clear English. You can choose the one you want to believe. One or all of them are true.

      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        From my experiences with them, it is most likely a combination of numbers 1&3.
      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by Bakkster (1529253)

        Same deal as when Best Buy offers to take your money so the Geek Squad can install your new XBox 360 game... and this was before it was possible to install to HDD.

      • by 228e2 (934443) on Wednesday March 24, 2010 @07:27PM (#31605336)
        Checkmate.

        Bestbuy has a constant track record of trying to confuse customers with computer terms so they will fold over and pay.
        Claiming the IP has to be synced is 100% BS because there is no NIC or USB port on the glasses, so saying the BestBuy computer experts (which i use loosely) were confused on the new technology is a cover up.
    • by PopeRatzo (965947) * on Wednesday March 24, 2010 @07:22PM (#31605290) Homepage Journal

      I don't think this was a deliberate attempt to defraud customers as much as it was a poor choice of verb.

      Best Buy is a multi-billion dollar corporation that can well afford copywriters. You can bet they don't make "poor choice(s) of words" when they're writing the fine print on their overpriced extended warranties.

      To suggest that this was just a "whoopsie" is absurd. Funny that the "poor choice of words" costs the customer an additional $150. How often do you think they made a "poor choice of words" that was in favor of the customer. And believe me, if that ever happens, there's going to be one out-of-work employee.

      Plus, this roll-out of the "3D" televisions is supposed to be one of the most anticipated product category introductions for them. Retailers like Best Buy are betting on a huge wave of "trade-ups" to 3D and they're counting on it saving their bottom line for years to come.

      The notion that they'd make an "innocent" mistake that happens to mislead customers to pay an additional $150 stretches the imagination.

    • Blue shirt one said the glasses need to be synced with the Blu-ray player. The second geek referred to the 3D glasses needing to sync to the player via the USB port within the glasses, an impossible feat as there is no USB port on the glasses. The third stated the need to acquire the glasses’ IP address to sync with the Blu-ray player. There is no IP address for 3D glasses; they have no connectivity to the Internet or network. The Samsung battery powered glasses “sync” to the 3D content w

    • by Trogre (513942)

      People use the term "sync" when it has nothing to do with synchronization.

      'N Sync

      QED

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by mcgrew (92797) *

      I don't think this was a deliberate attempt to defraud customers as much as it was a poor choice of verb.

      "Never attribute to stupidity that which can be explained by greedy self-interest." -me

      I think it IS a rippff after talking to Bill. Bill's a fellow a few years older than me, and is your typical computer user -- he doesn't know much about his computer at all. Well, he bought a multimedia computer from Best Buy so he could use HDMI to watch youtube on his hi-def TV (Bill's obviously got money since he d

  • Well then! (Score:4, Funny)

    by garcia (6573) on Wednesday March 24, 2010 @06:06PM (#31604496) Homepage

    Clearly hdguru.com needs to sync their database with their httpd.

  • by zebadee (551743) on Wednesday March 24, 2010 @06:10PM (#31604544) Homepage
    Best Buy Responds To “3D Glasses Syncing Service”

    (March 23, 2010) We asked Best Buy’s media relations department last week why Best Buy’s Geek Squad offers a fictional 3D glasses syncing service? (link to our original story). Below is the corporate response.

    “I wanted to address any lingering confusion about the characterization of services support in the Best Buy Samsung 3DTV offer that was advertised in yesterday’s (March 21) insert. We by no means intended to confuse our customers or offer fraudulent services. The offer is new to our stores, and our own employees were trained on it just this past week.

    Let me clarify the services that are included with this offer. Geek Squad will:

    1. Set up and connect your TV + up to 5 components (Blu Ray, Cable Box, Satellite Box, etc )

    2. Add your internet enabled Blu ray/Gaming Console or internet enabled TV to your existing wireless network so you can access online content such as Netflix and Pandora.

    3. Make sure your 3D glasses work – some solutions we sell need TV settings adjusted so that 3D glasses are enabled – there are both 3D and non 3D settings for viewing

    4. Review and teach you how to use all of your new gear.

    We have some customers who aren’t quite sure how the 3D glasses work, or that the glasses automatically sync with their new 3D TVs. So we wanted to convey that they can depend on Geek Squad to answer their questions during installation and set-up. There is no additional charge for this – and the Geek Squad 3D installation and networking services are included in the total price of this offer.

    You know we’re as enthusiastic about 3D as you are, and equally committed to help educate consumers about how to get the most from this home entertainment experience.”
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Kitkoan (1719118)

      Best Buy Responds To “3D Glasses Syncing Service” (March 23, 2010) We asked Best Buy’s media relations department last week why Best Buy’s Geek Squad offers a fictional 3D glasses syncing service? (link to our original story). Below is the corporate response. “I wanted to address any lingering confusion about the characterization of services support in the Best Buy Samsung 3DTV offer that was advertised in yesterday’s (March 21) insert. We by no means intended to confuse our customers or offer fraudulent services. The offer is new to our stores, and our own employees were trained on it just this past week.;

      The problem with a message like this is they want to use this as a 'sorry we goofed and now here's a fix'. Thing is, the message is still out in the public and will not be changed for the public eye. Thats great that the techie's that already knew this wasn't true got Best Buy to admit that its wrong, but Average Joe on the other hand still only see's that the fliers still state this function still happens, Best Buy's employee's will still state that this function is done, and the in store fliers will still

  • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 24, 2010 @06:10PM (#31604552)
    The last thing I need is for people to walk into my house and see me sitting on my couch wearing some goofy looking glasses.

    You know how like... some things don't look as ridiculous if several people are doing it at the same time (like, dancing, for example)? Well 3D glasses don't change that. A whole theater full of people still look individually absurd in a way that their numbers somehow do not correct for.
    • The glasses are precisely the reason. Never mind the look, never mind not wanting to wear them. The fundamental problem is that if you are watching in 3D mode, the screen is a blurry mess to anyone without glasses. It can be uncomfortable to look at. This means if you are sitting watching a movie and someone else walks in the room, it is a problem for them. With a normal TV, it doesn't matter. People can watch for a bit, no problem. Seeing it out of the side of your view it looks normal. Not here. It is eit

      • by dangitman (862676)

        The fundamental problem is that if you are watching in 3D mode, the screen is a blurry mess to anyone without glasses. It can be uncomfortable to look at. This means if you are sitting watching a movie and someone else walks in the room, it is a problem for them.

        Why is this even an issue? Either you're watching the movie or you're not. Why would you worry about the ability of someone who is not watching the movie to watch the movie? If they want to watch it, they'll put on the glasses.

        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by nextekcarl (1402899)

          If a pair is available. How many pairs do you get with the TV? If you have roommates who generally watch their own TVs, or friends who only come over infrequently, will you have enough glasses for them? Can you be sure someone won't misplace one or more pairs of them? I'm certain pretty much every time we used them one of them would go missing (my wife seems to like finding new places to hide things (completely unconsciously of course)) so I'll probably never get one myself, though I'd like one.

          • by dangitman (862676)
            Well, then turn the 3D off if you don't have enough glasses. But I'm not sure why you'd be particularly concerned about random passers-by who didn't care enough to watch the movie from the start.
            • Why buy the 3D TV if you're just going to turn it off then? Seems rather wasteful. Of course, if it was the same price, you might as well get it, but I'm assuming it will be an optional 'extra' for a little while yet.

              • by dangitman (862676)

                Why buy the 3D TV if you're just going to turn it off then? Seems rather wasteful.

                You wouldn't if you were never going to turn it on. But you might want to turn it off in some situations, as mentioned here, and turn it on in other situations. Do you even read the thread before replying?

        • You've never stood in a room and chatted with someone while they watched something? You've never watched a bit and then wandered on?

          Remember we aren't talking about something here where you just see it in 2D. We are talking about where you see something that is a mass of two images flickering that is hard to look at. It is annoying.

          Also there's the issue of number of glasses. Do you get enough for everyone in your family plus some? Or do you have less, but then have to switch it back to 2D when more people

          • by dangitman (862676) on Wednesday March 24, 2010 @08:00PM (#31605624)

            A 3D movie is intended to be an immersive experience. Not background entertainment. If you want to use it that way, just turn the 3D off.

            I, for one, am sick of people treating movies this way. If you're not going to commit to the screening, then fuck the hell off, and don't disturb the people who are watching the movie.

            • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

              by DavidTC (10147)

              I, for one, am sick of people treating movies this way. If you're not going to commit to the screening, then fuck the hell off, and don't disturb the people who are watching the movie.

              I'm with you.

              It is entirely reasonable to throw on some movie in the background, I guess. I probably wouldn't do that, I don't like having distracting narratives running in the background while I'm trying to do things, I prefer music, but whatever, plenty of people seem to be okay with that.

              If you do that, you, duh, would

          • The ultimate problem to be solved is the same one that drove HD: sports. HD evening news is pointless. HD sitcoms, not much better. HD movies, well, those are nice. But sports drove HD, and they'll drive 3D as soon as someone comes up with technology that lets you have 20 people over to watch the Big Game. Until then, I'm pretty sure that 3D TV will be a gimmick that most people buy only because it's a basically free add-on.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      The LAST thing on my list of "stuff I really care about" is what people who walk into my house think of how I look when using 3D glasses. If this is something you're really that worked up about, I would suggest that your priorities are a little off. It's your own house, do what you want. Stop caring so much about what other people think.
    • by am 2k (217885) on Wednesday March 24, 2010 @06:36PM (#31604854) Homepage

      The first thing I'd think if somebody walked into my house while I'm watching some 3D movie would be "how tf did that person get through the locked door?"

    • by westlake (615356)

      The last thing I need is for people to walk into my house and see me sitting on my couch wearing some goofy looking glasses.

      But they will ooh and ahh when they first see your new home theater set-up.

      Hear the muscular eight channel surround sound audio. Test the recliner lounge seating. The glasses are simply part of the theatrical experience - and they will give them a try.

    • The last thing I need is for people to walk into my house and see me sitting on my couch wearing some goofy looking glasses.

      Only two people outside of my wife and I have keys to my house*, and are thus likely to just walk in** - and both are friends of decades standing. Neither would care about me looking 'goofy'.

      If you don't want people 'just walking in' to your house, lock you're friggin' door.

      * They often care for our pets when we are away. Because it made things simpler I finally just told them to ke

    • The last thing I need is for people to walk into my house and see me sitting on my couch wearing some goofy looking glasses.

      Maybe if you moved out of your parents' basement you wouldn't have to worry about random people coming in and saying hi.

  • I'll bet... (Score:2, Funny)

    by Al's Hat (1765456)

    ...they don't tell you about needing to adjust the framistat (and the additional charge) until they show up for the install.

  • by onyxruby (118189) <{onyxruby} {at} {comcast.net}> on Wednesday March 24, 2010 @06:17PM (#31604642)
    Chances are someone in the marketing department saw this and added 'syncing' of their own accord. They saw a buzzword, didn't know what they were talking about and made the ad accordingly. I doubt this was intentional fraud, and their answer sets the record straight on that. As one version of the old saying goes, "never attribute to malice that which is simple incompetence". Hopefully best buy will learn and have someone who is technically savvy review things in the future. After all who hasn't occasionally seen something like a dual core 2Ghz chip advertised as 4Ghz or a system advertised as having 1TB of memory?
    • by Dare nMc (468959)

      it is very hard to differentiate "marketing" from fraud, especially in this case. "deceit for a profit" is both fraud and marketing, when done like this, it is just not legally actionable fraud...
      Wanting to make their service sound more useful and necessary than it really was, is fraud IMHO (regardless if the marketing dept meant to be truthful and failed, they were attempting deceit to justify them over-stating the value of the service.) But the intent would prevent this from being legally

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by Vapor8 (240870)

      Hopefully best buy will learn and have someone who is technically savvy review things in the future.

      Do you REALLY believe that Best Buy, a company with revenues of 45 BILLION dollars in 2008, and a company who makes most of its money selling 'technology related goods', isn't having a technically savvy TEAM review things? I'm afraid you're overly simplifying things here...

      Did they screw up? Yes. Should we give them the benefit of the doubt? Maybe. Their past fumblings do indeed show a pattern, so my inclination to give them the benefit of the doubt becomes smaller and smaller each time I read stories like

  • by MrCrassic (994046) <deprecated AT ema DOT il> on Wednesday March 24, 2010 @06:20PM (#31604686) Journal
    1. The main links are Slashdotted, so here's its Google Cache: link [74.125.47.132]
    2. Are all of Best Buy's ads printed nationwide, or do they vary by region? If the latter case is true, then I can't say I'm truly surprised, as shoddy areas would be more likely to offer shoddy services such as this. On the other hand, if the false service was nationally marketed, then it would make me even more worried (and more confident) that Best Buy is caring significantly less about being a quality chain post Circuit City/CompUSA's demise.
  • Be sure to sell your technically inept friends this great 3D advice:
    • Be sure to shake the glasses fervently to make sure that lens fluid remains fresh and your 3D viewing experience is homogeneous from the top of your eye to the bottom.
    • Old photons collect in the corner of the glasses. A toothbrush wrapped with tinfoil will quickly allow you to wick these away from time to time.
    • Sometimes glasses get 'out of sync' with the infrared emitter. If you suspect this, press your forehead against the middle of the display unit and slowly back away. Slower. Slower. That's it.
    • Hanging small rocks from the back of the glasses arm behind your ear prevents unwanted frontal ejection of your glasses from your facial region.
    • If you do not have access to small rocks, a large piece of duct tape attached to the bridge of your nose will block the glasses from falling forward during your viewing session.
    • Photons exhibit a common physical property known as "the duality of light" which occurs when the photon becomes confused about which color it should be when it sees photons of other colors. Make sure everything in your viewing room is painted or colored white so that no photon confusion interrupts your genuine 3D experience.

    Man, if only bullshit was source of income. What a second, I feel a political career beginning!

    • by djdanlib (732853) on Wednesday March 24, 2010 @07:13PM (#31605206) Homepage

      Wait, wait, you need to paint the room matte black so those photons don't bounce off the wall and enter the wrong lens by mistake! That's why they make the screen border and all your home stereo equipment black, you know!

      If the 3D effect isn't working, make sure the cable isn't kinked. (Like a garden hose, it causes data flow problems if the cable is kinked.) If you're using the component cables, they have to be rotated JUST RIGHT or it doesn't work. I know it's a hassle, but spend the time and you'll get the absolute best picture you can get!

      *tips hat to parent poster

  • Then again (Score:2, Informative)

    I can understand why most of you think this could be FUD, but here's my argument against that position:

    If a company propositions a service, not just any service but an EXPENSIVE one, what legitimacy is there in advertising a feature of that service that the tech doesn't even do and isn't required for them TO do?

    Now, in the response, Best buy stated this in relation to the 3D aspect: "3. Make sure your 3D glasses work - some solutions we sell need TV settings adjusted so that 3D glasses are enabled - there

    • by Spykk (823586)
      Imagine you are a layperson who doesn't understand the concepts involved. You see two ads; one that mentions they will sync the glasses for you, and one that doesn't mention syncing at all. Wouldn't you think that you better go with the first ad because you don't know how to sync the glasses yourself?
  • Oblig (Score:5, Funny)

    by AmigaHeretic (991368) on Wednesday March 24, 2010 @06:29PM (#31604784) Journal
    "24K gold-plated connectors help protect the cable's optical lens to ensure consistent signal transfer"

    http://www.bestbuy.com/site/Rocketfish%26%23153%3B+-+8'+Digital+Optical+Cable/8315147.p?id=1174694191675&skuId=8315147&st=optical [bestbuy.com]


    --
    • Re:Oblig (Score:4, Informative)

      by theskipper (461997) on Wednesday March 24, 2010 @08:19PM (#31605744)

      Yeah, +5 funny but the comments are proof that this type of marketing works:

      NoSympathy from Cincinnati, OH
      "I have two def tech 7006 towers hooked up to a denon 1909 and my TV running into my reciever with this cable to I can get sound from my antenna. Sounds pretty good to me. I know I could go with an M series monster cable that would destroy this cable , but for what I use it for, it works for me!"

      By caramella from san antonio, tx:
      "I just got this from my new home theater system and it's great. Sound quality is awesome. Better than my last cables . Also durable with mesh covering. Won't have to worry about torn cables."

      Ouch.

  • by BlueBoxSW.com (745855) on Wednesday March 24, 2010 @06:32PM (#31604806) Homepage

    Here's how marketing people work...

    They identify the features of a product, translate that into an advantage, then translate that into a benefit.

    People buy benefits, they don't buy features (most people anyway).

    So, if you have some commercial software package that zips the reports, it might go like this:

    Feature: zip tool

    Advantage: compress and encrypt

    Benefit: Secure and quickly transmit your reports

    In this case, they're trying to justify their Geek setup services:

    Feature: 3d glasses delivery and setup

    Advantage: not worrying about compatibility

    Benefit: Sync your 3D glasses to your TV

    Sure, it's not accurate, but marketing people don't always know the fine details of what they are talking about. If they did, they would be techies.

    As programmers/developers/techies, we hate to deal in Benefits. They are so hard to quantify and define. We like to deal in features, which can be validated (it's there and it works, or it's not there or doesn't work).

    • By offering a service that does not exist, Best Buy attempts to confuse people who may well be perfectly capable of setting up their home theater system into believing that they don't know enough to do it. Imagine if you will a fairly smart person who has a basic knowledge of home A/V systems. They read this ad and see that Best Buy will 'sync their 3d glasses.' They are pretty sure they can do everything else, after all, they have for every other home A/V system they've owned. But there's that 'sync the gl

  • Usually there's an "invert" button on the IR emitter to swap left/right eye -- you should press this if things look 3D, but horribly wrong somehow (or if the scene gets better when you turn the 3D glasses upside down and look through them).

    All verbal confusion aside, it's good that they are offering a setup service -- while the setup on the devices is not that complicated, it's a bit less trivial than programming a VCR. I could see a lot of inexperienced users (which is 99.999% of the population at this poi

  • No matter whether I'm dealing with polarization (some lenses in glasses in same batches are reversed or rotated), or LCD shutters, I've never seen a "3D" setup where the some of the glasses don't require a little tweaking; there is rarely automatic success.
  • The offer's only problem is that there is no such thing as syncing 3D glasses. They sync automatically."

    Both these statements can't be true. If the glasses sync automatically, then there is such a thing as syncing 3D glasses.

    The real question is, considering that the glasses sync automatically, should they be advertise this as a service they provide.

    Most likely not.

  • I say (Score:2, Flamebait)

    by thewils (463314)

    No need to sync the glasses thanks - now knock off a hundred and fifty bucks from your price.

  • by grapeape (137008) <mpope7@kc . r r . c om> on Wednesday March 24, 2010 @06:53PM (#31605016) Homepage

    This type of thing has been going on for months, try walking into a best buy and buying an "on sale" notebook that doesnt have a $39 Geek Squad "optimized" sticker on it. I tried a couple months back when an Acer was on sale that I wanted for my son, after arguing with the sales guy who told me they were basically unusable without it I left. Instead of a notebook I walked out with frustration and a determination to never step foot in a best buy again.

  • by Jackie_Chan_Fan (730745) on Wednesday March 24, 2010 @06:58PM (#31605056)
    Time for new competition.
  • lol (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Charliemopps (1157495) on Wednesday March 24, 2010 @07:15PM (#31605226)
    3D TV = Laser disc. 10 years from now we'll see these things sitting in goodwill and laugh our asses off.
  • by JustNiz (692889) on Wednesday March 24, 2010 @07:24PM (#31605306)

    Wearing the glasses upside-down or the wrong way round would cause incorrect left/right shutter sync and resultant loss of 3D effect.

    Anyone that would buy a TV from Best Buy must have limited intelligence, so Best Buy thoughtfully provide the glasses-sync service where they permanently epoxy the glasses to your head in the comfort of your own home. This value-for-money service prevents later user-error so ensures users will always get the full "amazing experience".

    This helpful service is already under attack from other tv manufacturers as they have identified it as anticompetitive due to the implicit vendor lock-in following installation.

  • Oh my. (Score:5, Funny)

    by Noland150 (847733) on Wednesday March 24, 2010 @07:38PM (#31605416)
    I hope this doesn't hurt the Geek Squad's reputation.
  • by drunkennewfiemidget (712572) on Wednesday March 24, 2010 @07:38PM (#31605422) Homepage

    Seriously -- you have to be on glue to buy shit from that big box store in the first place.

  • How to synchronize both eyes. Even after a few shots of Stoli.

  • but I miss Circuit City. At least there was competition to provide unsatisfactory service, now it's a dissatisfaction monopoly.
    Yes I know their online corpse lives on, but it's just a frontend for tigerdirect I think.
  • by scubamage (727538) on Thursday March 25, 2010 @02:11AM (#31607620)
    Honestly, I don't. To me its funny because I know better. It reminds me of the "egress" trick PT Barnum played on customers, granted in his circumstance it was more to get people to leave an overcrowded museum. Honestly what ever happened to caveat emptor? Its an optional service. Do some damn research and for god sake don't pay for it. If you've done the research to get such high end equipment go the extra mile to see what is necessary to configure it. What ever happened to informed decision making? If I'm laying out that kind of cash you can be damn well sure that I'm going to know every single piece of equipment down to whether or not the individual ports are gold plated. Bravo Best Buy, while its scheister-iffic, I applaud your idiot tax.

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