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Input Devices Apple

Droid Touchscreen Less Accurate Than iPhone's 198

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the click-on-this dept.
gyrogeerloose writes "A test published by MOTO labs comparing the accuracy and sensitivity of smartphone touchscreens among various makers gave the iPhone top marks ahead of HTC's Droid Eris, the Google-branded Nexus One and the Motorola Droid. The test was conducted within a drawing program using a finger to trace straight diagonal lines across the screens and then comparing the results. While it's not likely that a smart phone user is going to draw a lot of lines, the test does give some indication of which phones are most likely to properly respond to clicking on a link in a Web browser."
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Droid Touchscreen Less Accurate Than iPhone's

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  • by Anonymous Coward on Monday January 11, 2010 @09:42AM (#30722978)

    This is not the droid you're looking for.

  • Used "a program" ? (Score:4, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday January 11, 2010 @09:50AM (#30723058)

    Was the program written to the same quality in all platforms? Or did they just slap together one quickly to get some juicy headline out? A more worthwhile test would be to go to the same websites in the same stock browsers and log the number of error clicks. Blah.

    • by furball (2853)

      Does that measure the quality of the touchscreen or the quality of the web browser?

      • by Zocalo (252965)
        You could even that that point to another stage of abstraction. The OS UI, and by implication any style guides and applications, plays a key role in the requirements of the screen sensitivity. If your OS needs very precise, pixel perfect selections then you either need a highly accurate and expensive touch screen or a stylus, but if you design your UI around chunky buttons and screen sized-gestures then you can get away with a much less accurate and cheaper screen.

        A far more meaningful metric would be
    • by Anonymous Coward on Monday January 11, 2010 @09:59AM (#30723164)

      "These aren't the results I wanted to see, therefore the methodology is flawed!"

      • by assantisz (881107)
        Well, I am not a fanboy but the methodology of this test is flawed: using your own finger is not precise enough; using only a one-sized sample of each phone is not really scientific; so is not using the exact same algorithms for turning the touch screen events into on-screen pixels. The list goes on. I wouldn't be surprised that the iPhone's screen is better but the video does not convince me.
        • by icegreentea (974342) on Monday January 11, 2010 @10:14AM (#30723334)
          It doesn't matter if a finger isn't "precise" enough. The purpose of the testing is to determine real life performance. So you should be testing with something as precise as you would use in real life. What does it matter if a phone can detect the exact position of a pen point, when it goes nuts trying to find the center of your fingertip. What matters is consistency. In that case, the methodology is wrong. A single human isn't not consistent enough, even over the number of repetitions shown.
    • by SuperKendall (25149) on Monday January 11, 2010 @11:22AM (#30724186)

      Was the program written to the same quality in all platforms?

      It's a DRAWING PROGRAM.

      As in, they take in whatever pixel input the system gives them and spit them out on the screen. "Quality" does not enter into it, because they are all using the same API's that just have the OS feed them a stream of points.

      It's representative of the quality of touch accuracy you will have in other apps because they, too, will just look at what points the OS is presenting the user as having touched.

  • As a G1 user... (Score:5, Interesting)

    by foodnugget (663749) <eric-slashdot@@@ericfeldman...com> on Monday January 11, 2010 @09:53AM (#30723102)
    I have to admit that I am somewhat underwhelmed. I got the G1 shortly after it came out a year and a half or so ago, and the touchscreen definitely falls short of what it could be. It is FAR less responsive than the iphone's, and the accuracy could indeed be better. I was coming from a winmo 5 device, so i'm still incredibly happy with it, relatively speaking.

    So the big question is whether or not all the manufs of android devices are using the same screen/screen chips, or if android has a fundamental problem interpreting data off the screen?
    • by Dr. Evil (3501)

      The iPhone UI is so robust and responsive that it is *fun* to play with. No other phone I've seen so far comes close to that.

      • by aussersterne (212916) on Monday January 11, 2010 @04:43PM (#30729316) Homepage

        here saying I'd never use a touchscreen. Too inaccurate. I poo-poo'ed the iPhone when it was released and swore up and down I'd never leave Palm. Then, at an AT&T store I tried out an iPhone on a lark and I was blown away. I had an upgrade so I went to the iPhone immediately. I've had a chance to test a couple friends' Android phones since, and there's just no comparison.

        The iPhone interface is absolutely transparent; it feels like "real world" physics is at work, not like you're using a user interface. The same suspension of disbelief can't happen on Android because the UI just gets it wrong or lags behind you motions way too often.

    • I basically like my Droid, but it's not without numerable faults.

      The touchscreen isn't great (even forgiving that it doesn't do multi-touch like iPod/iPhone). When you're browsing a regular web page (something the Droid is up to, with its nice screen and good browser), sometimes the links are just too close to resolve the difference between them. Lots of frustrating touch...back...touch...back action going on.

  • Does whether or not you can draw diagonal lines on a screen really make a difference? As long as you can still click web links and the on-screen keyboard (where applicable) then who cares?

    • Re:So what? (Score:5, Informative)

      by Enry (630) <enry&wayga,net> on Monday January 11, 2010 @10:12AM (#30723320) Journal

      As a Droid user, I think I can answer this.

      In order to unlock the screen, you can use a gesture to unlock it. About 75% of the time, it works fine but the remainder of the time the gesture is not recorded correctly. There's a few games (word search) that often have issues marking an entire word.

      Only owning an iPod Touch, it's hard for me to do a side-by-side comparison since I don't do the same things with the droid as I do the touch. All that aside, I love the Droid.

      • Re:So what? (Score:4, Insightful)

        by _Sprocket_ (42527) on Monday January 11, 2010 @11:31AM (#30724276)

        As a Droid user, I think I can answer this.

        In order to unlock the screen, you can use a gesture to unlock it. About 75% of the time, it works fine but the remainder of the time the gesture is not recorded correctly. There's a few games (word search) that often have issues marking an entire word.

        Only owning an iPod Touch, it's hard for me to do a side-by-side comparison since I don't do the same things with the droid as I do the touch. All that aside, I love the Droid.

        I'm also a Droid user. I rarely have issues with the lock screen. The impression I've had is those times that I do, it's because I was trying to do some one-handed thumb swipe or slashing at the screen. I'll have to pay closer attention but I would have a hard time at this point thinking that this test has much practical application to my experience. Of course, I also do not use an iPhone or other Android phone so I have nothing to compare to.

        I do, however, miss the curved unlock widget. I prefer it over the newer, current linear one.

  • Maybe, maybe not. (Score:2, Insightful)

    by sseaman (931799)

    While it's not likely that a smart phone user is going to draw a lot of lines, the test does give some indication of which phones are most likely to properly respond to clicking on a link in a Web browser."

    A "gaming-grade" mouse and surface might have better sensitivity but I won't likely see a difference in browsing.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by jone1941 (516270)

      I think your comparison is a little off. If you look at the differences between these devices I would say it's closer to comparing a modern optical mouse to an old ball mouse. From my experience there is absolutely a difference between those two devices when browsing the internet or performing any other precise task. Perhaps I'm exaggerating, but I always though "gaming-grade" mouse and surfaces were akin to putting v-tech stickers on the side of your car.

  • What's important (Score:5, Interesting)

    by electricbern (1222632) on Monday January 11, 2010 @09:59AM (#30723168)
    Although drawling lines might be important to some, what really matters to most smartphone users is how the phone responds to misclicks. Is it able to detect it and adjust accordingly? There is more to it then the accuracy of the screen. You are using your phone while standing or walking so even if the screen is 100% accurate you probably won't be. What kind of correction algorithm the phone has to compensate for that?
    Of course creating a considerate test is too much trouble and just saying that the iPhone touchscreen is more accurate then Google's scores you plenty of apple-love.
  • by onion2k (203094) on Monday January 11, 2010 @10:00AM (#30723182) Homepage

    It doesn't follow that a lack of accuracy from dragging in a painting app would affect click accuracy in a browser at all. For example, the accuracy could degrade the longer you hold your finger to the screen due to moisture building up on your fingertip or due to reduced capacitance as the blood flow is restricted.

    If you want to test point accuracy then write an app to test that; don't test something completely different and then leap to a potentially inaccurate conclusion.

  • by assantisz (881107) on Monday January 11, 2010 @10:04AM (#30723232)
    I have a Droid and I just tried drawing diagonals in a paint program on the phone. Yes, I did get the waviness. All that means, though, is that the Droid is not a good choice for a phone if you want to draw on it. I am still able to use the on-screen keyboard just fine and even in a web browser I never have problems tapping a link no matter how far I am zoomed out. This is definitely not a deal-breaker for me. That said, the only reason why I have a Droid is because of the physical keyboard and a pretty decent free ssh client. The kids draw on it but they couldn't care less how straight the lines are or not.
    • by darjen (879890)

      yep, I feel the same way about my Droid. works fine, imho. this "test" has nothing to do with real life.

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by ShakaUVM (157947)

      Eh, I have a Droid and I hate the physical keyboard. The keys are just too tiny - the on-screen keyboard keys are actually easier to hit.

      I have an iPod Touch, too, and I'd agree that the iPod's screen is better. Just in terms of overall feel - the droid is actually more accurate when using the on-screen keyboard, but it's way too eager to click instead of scroll, meaning that when you're paging around through your contacts you'll accidentally dial people, and when dragging around inside of the browser, you'

    • by mewsenews (251487)

      That said, the only reason why I have a Droid is because of the physical keyboard and a pretty decent free ssh client.

      Do you happen to have any links illustrating the ssh client you mentioned? Sounds interesting.

  • but they left it out. I'm looking to move to verizon just to get one once the new pre++ or w/e comes out later this month.
  • Non-Issue (Score:4, Funny)

    by LinuxAndLube (1526389) on Monday January 11, 2010 @10:10AM (#30723296)
    This is obviously a non-issue. Just wiggle your finger a bit to draw straight lines.
  • Resolution? (Score:5, Interesting)

    by phobos512 (766371) on Monday January 11, 2010 @10:15AM (#30723340) Homepage
    What effect does the fact that the iPhone has a vastly lower resolution screen play in this accuracy "test"? Seems it would make it easier to be more accurate.
    • Re:Resolution? (Score:4, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward on Monday January 11, 2010 @10:26AM (#30723486)

      No effect. First, the touchscreen resolution differs from the display resolution. Second, these tests are showing results at the image level, from a distance away. We're not talking about, say, the Droid displaying wiggles on the order of 1-2 pixels. The wiggles subsume a large number of pixels. Further, even though the iPhone has a lower-resolution screen, it makes excellent use of antialiasing. You can observe position changes that, on average, are less than the pixel pitch with such methods.

  • There is a ton of code in both the Iphone OS and the browser to improve click "quality" of links and buttons and stuff in the product.

    They do this, because this is NOT a stylus product, but a product used with fingers. There is even code, that takes account of the consistent errors that YOU, the registered user, make.

    They may or may not do this in android.

    But at the end of the day, this is not anywhere near the test, nor the conclusions you should be drawing from the test.

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by NameIsDavid (945872)
      This test is the result of the combined hardware-software system that results, at the end of the chain, in the API providing the app with a position. This is what the test ought to show. It doesn't matter if Apple's hardware or software takes the credit for the improved positional accuracy since the end result is what counts. What it does mean is that if the benefits stem from the post-touch processing in software, Android ought to be able to make the required changes to improve things. Until then, though
  • by fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) on Monday January 11, 2010 @10:17AM (#30723382) Journal
    Is whether other flavors of applications do their own "cheating" to compensate for this.

    In the classic desktop keyboard/mouse arrangement, it is more or less taken for granted that the user will be able to accurately press any button, and put the mouse within a couple pixels of any target(with the exception of somewhat disabled users).

    Phones with hard buttons and resistive/stylus touch screens more or less closely approximate this.

    Capacitive screens, by contrast, are better for finger work; but rather less precise. This creates a strong incentive to write the software to be as silently forgiving of certain errors as possible. Drawing programs are hard, since there is basically no way(short of an artistic AI) to infer the user's desire. You pretty much have to make do with the best your screen can give you. With a web browser, say, you can fairly strongly assume that users are intersted in clicking on links, rather than just jabbing at inert text, and expand the link target area appropriately. Same thing with all the tricks that touchscreen keyboards use, silently expanding target areas in order to augment accuracy.

    It is definitely useful to know how good the raw input is, and more accurate is of course better; but in a class of devices defined by fairly inaccurate input devices, the real question is how good the software's intepretation of the input will be.
    • by dzfoo (772245) on Monday January 11, 2010 @11:28AM (#30724238)

      That would be very true if touchscreens were purely a point-and-click (or aim-and-stab) input control. However, what Apple has tried to do with the iPhone (and the recent "Magic Mouse" is indicative of this trend) is to create a new human-device interface mechanism that depends more on natural and intuitive gestures than aiming and stabbing a specific screen area. Because of this, the ability to track finger movements consistently and accurately is very important.

      If, on the other hand, your user interface depends on a literal translation of a desktop point-and-click GUI, designed to be used primarily with a mouse and keyboard, to a touchscreen input control; then, of course, consistent and accurate tracking is less important than detecting the precise region where pressure was applied at a specific time. But if that is the case, the problems are deeper than just accuracy.

              -dZ.

  • Ah, groupthink (Score:5, Insightful)

    by schmidt349 (690948) on Monday January 11, 2010 @10:22AM (#30723434)

    If you spent five minutes looking at this outfit's methodology you'd realize that the test is sound, though perhaps a little exacting compared to real-world use cases. But what I love is that the first twenty posts or so basically all offered apologies for the Android phones and denigrated the significance of the test. They couldn't be better PR responses if Google and Motorola had drafted them. If you happen to use and like an Android device, why don't you just admit that it has a flaw and deal with it? God knows it probably isn't going to affect you under most usual circumstances.

    I can't tell you for how long I was and still am pissed off about various missing features on the iPhone (auto-SMS, copy/paste, etc.) but I still like the device overall and use it. You don't have to hold this borderline view of the world in which computing devices are either God's work on Earth or Satan's playthings.

    • iPhone has copy past for a few months now.

      Most of the problems with the iPhone is based Apple not playing hardball with AT&T to get the really good features in.

    • Re:Ah, groupthink (Score:5, Insightful)

      by jo_ham (604554) <joham999@noSPaM.gmail.com> on Monday January 11, 2010 @10:55AM (#30723876)

      I was thinking the exact same thing, and if the results had been reversed and the Droid had been on top, we'd have had a flurry of posts talking about how the iPhone is an overpriced and inferior option.

      I also have issues with my iPhone (lack of built in MMS initially, lack of cut and paste until recently, annoyance that you still can't sync up your ToDo items from iCal with the built in calendar app and have to rely on third party apps, annoyance that you have to manually disable wifi if are trying to use 3G in an area with a hotspot, where it will try to use that wifi, even if you don't have a password for it, or its one of those web login ones).

      What's wrong with saying "the droid's touch sensitivity is less effective than I'd like"? It seems like droid users are just as zealous about their phones as they accuse iPhone users of being.

      • by _Sprocket_ (42527)

        I was thinking the exact same thing, and if the results had been reversed and the Droid had been on top, we'd have had a flurry of posts talking about how the iPhone is an overpriced and inferior option.

        And we'd have a flurry of posts talking about how insanely great the iPhone's user experience is or some other dismissive language.

        What's wrong with saying "the droid's touch sensitivity is less effective than I'd like"? It seems like droid users are just as zealous about their phones as they accuse iPhone users of being.

        Because I can't agree with it. Apparently the Droid's touch sensitivity isn't as good as other devices. But until seeing this test, I didn't realize it. It's not like there was this glaring issue and this test is the "aha" moment that explains it all (unlike, say, the Droid's camera and the focus bug). Would I like the sensitivity to improve? I guess. But I'm not sure I'd

        • by jo_ham (604554)

          Those are my points - and the same is true for the iPhone. It doesn't sync todo items from iCal, which didn't bother me for the first 6 months I owned it, until I actually started using them in iCal and found the phone lacking in that area. It's not a glaring flaw in the iPhone but it is an annoyance for me now (using a third party app to fill in the feature).

          I don't see this touch screen issue as a major flaw of the Droid, but from the way people have come flooding out to declare the test flawed is just in

      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by WiiVault (1039946)
        Yeah and look at the tags: applesucks and applefud. Both of which make no sense considering Apple has nothing to do with this outfit or its results, which happen to favor their "sucky" product. Hate Apple for all they shit they actually do, not just because they may have a slightly better touch accuracy on their phone.
    • If you are still pissed of about features that are now available, then you are every company's worst-customer-scenario personified.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by DeadCatX2 (950953)

      One human drags his finger around a few touch screen cell phones and starts making what appears to be "statements of fact" about the quality and accuracy of those phones. Excuse me if I don't consider the results to be rigorous.

      Look at how loaded the headline is. It definitely deserves to be here on slashdot, that's for sure. Go look for topics where the Droid beats the iPhone and you see the exact opposite in effect; people offering apologies for the iPhone or denigrating, etc.

      The guy in the linked arti

    • by Graff (532189)

      If you spent five minutes looking at this outfit's methodology you'd realize that the test is sound, though perhaps a little exacting compared to real-world use cases.

      It's not really that great of a methodology. First of all it depends on something that is very difficult to get right, consistency in pressure and accuracy of a human finger. Changing the pressure, position, or angle of your finger can drastically change which capacitive element is triggered on the screen. It becomes difficult to separate errors in the touchscreen from the inaccuracy of the tester's finger.

      Secondly, there could be algorithms that account for the motion of the touch in order to predict the n

    • Re:Ah, groupthink (Score:5, Interesting)

      by 0xdeadbeef (28836) on Monday January 11, 2010 @01:13PM (#30725820) Homepage Journal

      If you spent five minutes looking at this outfit's methodology you'd realize that the test is sound

      I spent less than five minutes watching the video and I realized I had been wasting my time, because this "test" is an absolute joke. He isn't balancing his finger against a straight edge, he isn't moving it at a constant rate, and the results in the video don't correspond to the images on the web site.

      Before I watched the video, I thought it had some legitimacy, as I got wavy lines when I drew on my Nexus One. But then I tried it with my finger against a pen laid diagonally across the screen, and it produced a perfect straight line, at every speed. The whole article is a fanboy blowing smoke, relying on the twitchy human nervous system.

      I think Martin Sheen said it best:

      Willard: They told me that you had gone totally insane, and that your methods were unsound.
      Kurtz: Are my methods unsound?
      Willard: I don't see any method at all, sir.

      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by dbcad7 (771464)
        In examining the screenshots, and downloading a free draw program from Android Market (DrawNoteK) my results were the same as the iphones without even trying. My phone is a myTouch, which is also a HTC phone, that the articles results seem to favor over the Motorola, but as I got nowhere near the squiggly lines that they show in their screenshots, the whole thing is suspect.. I guess someone with a Motorola will have to try it themselves as well.. but for now I call BS.
  • "While it's not likely that a smart phone user is going to draw a lot of lines, the test does give some indication of which phones are most likely to properly respond to clicking on a link in a Web browser." I don't suppose they considered instead testing which phones properly respond to clicking on links in Web browsers?
    • The links are less a problem, this works well, it can be interpolated, but the bigger issue is the text input, where the droid fortunately has a hardware keyboard.

    • It appears to be app-dependent. My Droid always seems to click just below where I touch on web pages, but the painting app I downloaded could draw very, very straight lines. The pinch-zoom browser from the Milestone has helped, and the leaked Swype beta is perfect.
    • "While it's not likely that a smart phone user is going to draw a lot of lines, the test does give some indication of which phones are most likely to properly respond to clicking on a link in a Web browser." I don't suppose they considered instead testing which phones properly respond to clicking on links in Web browsers?

      That's harder to test reliably.

      Is the user used to a particular device? I'm noticing different systems have different learning curves for aiming.

      I'm used to my iPhone 3Gs that I got at release. It took a few days to get accustomed to typing/licking but afterward I was able to use that like a champ. I have big fingers, but once I learned where to click I can click on even small web links.

      Recently I tried using a Nexus One and I'm kind of starting at square one such as when I first tried the iPhone. Using

  • Much like the FPS discussion in video games from last week, there comes a point where being super-extra-accurate doesn't matter, and this is one of them.

  • by laing (303349) on Monday January 11, 2010 @11:06AM (#30723992)
    My wife and kids all have Iphones and I've used them. I just got a Nexus phone and I love it. I agree with the summation that the screen is not as responsive as the Apple phone. It took me a bit of trial and error but I discovered that you must tap quickly to get the phone to respond well. If you are slow it often seems to ignore the input. This may be a software issue. I hope that it is, and that it will be fixed soon.

    I haven't yet seen anybody else make the following observation so I wonder if it's just my phone, but the audio level that comes out of the Nexus is noticeably lower than what comes out of the Iphone. I can turn the volume on the thing all the way up and it is still very weak in comparison. This applies to both ring tones and multimedia audio. This is more likely to be a hardware issue so I will not hold my breath waiting for a fix.

  • Droid Eris User (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Odin_Tiger (585113) on Monday January 11, 2010 @11:09AM (#30724026) Journal
    I have a Droid Eris, and as a guy with bigger hands that usually has trouble with these kinds of devices, I have to say I'm very happy with the accuracy - I almost never make a mis-click, even typing quite fast on the touchscreen keyboard.
    However, I'm disappointed in responsiveness. The interface reminds me of playing an online game on a shitty internet connection when your roommate is loading a new YouTube video ever few minutes - without warning, for no apparent reason, and rarely in doing the same action twice, a click / tap will take up to 2 or 3 seconds to register. It's accurate, sure, but that's meaningless when I can't tell whether the thing is froze up or it just didn't detect my click, and don't dare click again for fear of accidentally clicking whatever happens to be in that same spot on the next page if the first click did register.
  • Software >> hardware.

    I have a Droid. The browser always seems to click the wrong link - usually too low. The Android keyboard was marginal. The HTC keyboard was better. Swype is perfect. Most of the other apps are pretty accurate. I downloaded a drawing app and got nice straight lines. Given the amount of effort Apple put into the iPhone OS, it's not surprising that they have a better UI. I wouldn't be surprised to find that the curvature at the edges of the iPhone screen is an intentional eff
  • If they wanted to test the accuracy of clicking links in a webpage, wouldn't they have tested it by clicking links in a webpage?

    • by dzfoo (772245)

      True, but as pointed out above, they weren't testing the accuracy of clicking links on a webpage; they were testing the accuracy of tracking finger gestures, which seems to be the new trend in touchscreen devices.

              -dZ.

  • by Jeffrey Baker (6191) on Monday January 11, 2010 @11:21AM (#30724180)

    I don't have a droid so I can't confirm, but this flickr user seems to have replicated the test on the Droid with far different results:

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/42580856@N08/4264037413/ [flickr.com]

  • by noc007 (633443) on Monday January 11, 2010 @11:26AM (#30724222)

    The legitimacy or how real world it applies aside, I'm disappointed with Motorola on this one. The Droid is an expensive device from a brand name manufacturer made in 2009. I expect a level of build quality, feature set, and accuracy. For a capacitance touch screen released in 2009, I would expect a level of accuracy that's at least comparable to the last generation of the iPhone, not accuracy that's poorer than a first gen iPhone.

    Coming from resistive touchscreens on Windows Mobile and Palm devices and the device in general, I am overall pretty happy with my Droid. I do have inaccuracies from time to time, but it's ok. Using the onscreen keyboard has been pretty accurate; most of my errors I have attributed to my finger being in the wrong place. Sadly, this is another weapon for the annoying Apple fanboy; pissing contests are annoying and the constant Apple fanboy counter argument of being about to talk and do data at the same time is getting really old and doesn't apply to how I generally use the device.

  • Couldn't repeat (Score:5, Interesting)

    by limaxray (1292094) on Monday January 11, 2010 @11:29AM (#30724256) Homepage
    First off, I have both a Droid and a 32GB iPod Touch. Frankly, I like the touch on the Droid better than the iPod - I find it more responsive and more accurate when playing the same game or browsing the web on both devices. It may just be my perception, but I simply find myself becoming less aggravated with the Droid's touch screen than the iPod's.

    While I don't have the iPod with me right now, I do have my Droid and was able to try this experiment. I used an app called 'Simply Draw' and was not able to repeat their results. Every time I try, I get lines that are as straight as my finger can make them. I have yet to produce lines like those in the article no matter how hard I try - even using multi-touch to draw 2 lines at once works perfectly.

    One problem I have noticed with the Droid that may be the cause here is the touchscreen is very sensitive to noisy power supplies. Using a cheap wall charger has a HUGE impact on the accuracy of the touch screen. I'm guessing Motorola didn't use any ferrites on the USB signals, allowing high frequency noise from an external supply to negatively impact the device. I suspect placing a ferrite on the USB cable near the phone end would minimize this issue, but have yet to try it myself. Instead, I just use quality chargers.
  • The test is biased (Score:4, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday January 11, 2010 @12:13PM (#30724906)

    [disclamer: i'm working in touch-screen business but not for apple/cellphone company]

    This test is biased as:
    - user perfomed, we use robot for this kind of qualification (but you can still get an overview if you use jigs)
    - strait lines are not the best to see if some king of trajectory filtering is done by the OS: use curve lines, or corners (to see over/undershoot)
    - to check if the border effect will affect the point perfomance, touch the screen at regularly spaced points (use a transparent plastic with dots printed on it)
    - it would be interesting to get the raw data sent from the touch sensor to check sampling rate & multi touch tracking (and thus removing, the OS and software filtering)

    That said, when you are in front of a new touch sensor, the strait lines test on the border is a 'universal' benchmark performed by everyone in the field...

     

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