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Microsoft Boasts 96% Netbook Penetration 774

Posted by kdawson
from the sure-you-did dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Citing figures from market research firm NPD, Microsoft says Windows' share of the US netbook market has ballooned from less than 10% in the first half of 2008 to 96% as of February. 'The growth of Windows on netbook PCs over the last year has been phenomenal,' wrote Brandon LeBlanc, Microsoft's in-house Windows blogger, in a post Friday. Information Week author Paul McDougall notes Microsoft's 8% decline in Windows sales is due to netbooks sporting Linux. How does Redmond make an 80% gain in netbook market share without the sales numbers reflecting that gain?"
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Microsoft Boasts 96% Netbook Penetration

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  • by Anonymous Coward on Monday April 06, 2009 @09:21PM (#27483611)
    Chair penetrates netbook 96%.
  • Honeymoon is over (Score:5, Insightful)

    by QuantumG (50515) * <qg@biodome.org> on Monday April 06, 2009 @09:24PM (#27483631) Homepage Journal

    For a short while people were willing to forgo Windows for the form factor and price of a netbook. Then Moore's law ticked over and Microsoft was able to enter that market - same price for the machine but with the specs that XP needs. Next iteration they'll be selling units with Vista on them. The only way to keep Microsoft out is to race to the bottom and there's no economic incentive for the hardware manufacturers to do that.

    • by Anonymous Coward on Monday April 06, 2009 @09:27PM (#27483663)

      one word: ARM

      • by rbanffy (584143) on Monday April 06, 2009 @09:32PM (#27483705) Homepage Journal

        Actually, it's an acronym. ;-)

      • by digitalunity (19107) <digitalunity@yah ... minus herbivore> on Monday April 06, 2009 @09:47PM (#27483813) Homepage

        MS has an IA64 release of Windows and it probably costs them a fortune to maintain for little benefit other than to let Intel know they support them, even when they are epic failures. I wouldn't hold my breath for an Windows 7 ARM edition.

        I guess regarding this farfetched 96% statistic... Look who it's coming from. Brought to you by the same market researchers who contended the 13-17 year old music listeners would accept ad-supported music. The 96% figure seems more likely to be a massive error in calculation than anything.

        I've spoken with a few retailers about their Netbook selection and as far as I can tell, Linux dominates based on price. Sure, I don't have hard data to back it up but 96% seems off-the-map implausible.

        http://www.reuters.com/article/pressRelease/idUS137134+31-Mar-2009+BW20090331 [reuters.com]

        • Windows on ARM (Score:5, Interesting)

          by fm6 (162816) on Monday April 06, 2009 @10:29PM (#27484125) Homepage Journal

          I don't think that MS came up with Windows for Itanium just to "let Intel know they support them." They did it because they thought Itanium would be the Next Big Thing. As did a lot of other software vendors — all the major Unixes had Itanium versions, though they were mostly cancelled once the schedule started slipping.

          Of course, Itanium is now seen as a white elephant, and all the effort people put into developing for it was wasted. But that's hindsight.

          Just because MS got burned with Itanium doesn't mean they'll automatically stay away from ARM. If they see the whole netbook market taking off and face real competition from ARM netbooks, they might just do it.

          The big stumbling block might be simple technology. ARM is, by design, a very simple, unsophisticated chip. I have to wonder if it can keep up with all the overhead of running Windows.

        • Re:Honeymoon is over (Score:5, Informative)

          by nxtw (866177) on Monday April 06, 2009 @10:31PM (#27484143)

          And where were the retailers you talked to?

          There are no longer any Linux netbooks for sale at physical retail stores where I live (USA). No, it's not that they're out of stock frequently (as some Windows models are); they are no longer kept in stock.

          Target is the only retailer that even lists Linux models on their website; they used to sell the 7" Eee PC in stores. Now they sell Windows models in-store & advertise them, as do all the other retail stores that sell computers.

          • by JordanL (886154) <jordan.ledouxNO@SPAMgmail.com> on Monday April 06, 2009 @10:52PM (#27484277) Homepage
            WHOA!

            You live in the whole USA?!
          • by waferhead (557795) <waferhead@[ ]oo.com ['yah' in gap]> on Monday April 06, 2009 @11:15PM (#27484439)

            "There are no longer any Linux netbooks for sale at physical retail stores where I live (USA). No, it's not that they're out of stock frequently (as some Windows models are); they are no longer kept in stock.

            Target is the only retailer that even lists Linux models on their website; they used to sell the 7" Eee PC in stores. Now they sell Windows models in-store & advertise them, as do all the other retail stores that sell computers."

            The conspiracy theory loving part of me wonders if that was actually sales driven, or driven on the golf course. :-\

          • Re:Honeymoon is over (Score:5, Informative)

            by itsme1234 (199680) on Tuesday April 07, 2009 @02:06AM (#27485515)

            Not only linux versions are hard or impossible to find but because of the licensing agreements with M$ (for XP) the hardware specs are crippled to 1GB RAM and 160GB hdd. So if you want a larger hdd and 2GB RAM (many people do, take a look at forum.eeeuser.com) you need to buy them yourself and then decide if ebay is worth the trouble for the parts you took out (which might be a bad idea in case you need to send the device back for warranty). So not only you pay extra for windows with no way out (even if you want to use linux on the machine or if you already have a transferable license for XP or why not even Vista) but you also pay for a 1GB RAM stick and a small(ish) hard drive. These add up to quite a lot, easily 20-30% of the tag price.

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by Blakey Rat (99501)

        Christ.

        Every netbook article on Slashdot, somebody brings up the ARM chip. Fine. ARM.

        Here's a challenge: link me to an ARM netbook I can buy right now. Not a "development platform" not some in-development idea, but an actual physical piece of hardware I can walk into Fry's right now and buy off the shelf. Sure you can find AMD netbooks, but ARM netbooks? Nah. Far and away, it's Atom.

        This weird Slashdot hallucination that ARM matters in the netbook market gets sadder and sadder as Intel Atom CPUs dominate mo

    • by motek (179836) on Monday April 06, 2009 @09:27PM (#27483667) Homepage

      Is there any other way to call it? 'Race to the bottom' sounds so crass. Perhaps 'delivering better customer value by focusing on essential factors while reducing extraneous costs?' I raced to the bottom once and I found really weird stuff there...

    • by Vectronic (1221470) on Monday April 06, 2009 @09:33PM (#27483711)

      The only way to keep bloated software out is to race to the bottom, the only way to keep Microsoft out is to provide an alternative that surpasses it in desirability.

      If we all used $100 machines, that were 500mhz, and 10GB's of HD space etc, Microsoft will just create trimmed down versions to run on it, thus not getting rid of Microsoft.

      But if you have something that personal and corporate users prefer over Microsoft's products, then it doesn't matter how low or highly spec'd the machine is, they'll want that software.

    • by jmorris42 (1458) * <jmorris&beau,org> on Monday April 06, 2009 @09:40PM (#27483755)

      > The only way to keep Microsoft out is to race to the bottom and there's no economic
      > incentive for the hardware manufacturers to do that.

      There is no incentive for the CURRENT manufacturers to do that. But if you aren't in the laptop/pc business right now there is good reasons to see an opportunity to have the first $150 laptop and sell the ever luvin crap out of them as Xmas impulse items through retail outlets that won't care about cannibalizing their laptop sales because they don''t currently sell computers at all.

      By your logic we would have never seen the $24.99 DVD player because "Who wants to race to the bottom." No, Sony or Phillips didn't do it but no name Chinese outfits did it and make a profit at it. The computer is poised to make that last transition to disposable consumer electronics.

      They won't be trying to kill Microsoft, it will just be that they can't give em enough royalties to matter when selling on consumer electronics margins. So even if Microsoft made em a deal, once the marketplace finishes the move to consumer electronics Microsoft is going to be a shadow of it's former self. And Apple is just as boned.

      • Re:Honeymoon is over (Score:5, Interesting)

        by peragrin (659227) on Monday April 06, 2009 @09:59PM (#27483907)

        As Torvald's once said I have not set out to destroy MSFT it is a completely unintentional side effect.

      • Re:Honeymoon is over (Score:5, Interesting)

        by node 3 (115640) on Monday April 06, 2009 @11:15PM (#27484435)

        And Apple is just as boned.

        Three things come to mind:

        1. Apple has always focused on the higher-end market. This market will always be there, even when $150 netbooks are a reality.
        2. Apple makes the OS, and can afford to make essentially zero on it if needed on a netbook.
        3. Apple has done very well in consumer electronics this century.

        1 and 3 really don't matter much to MS in this regard. Number 2, though, will be the tough one. They could possibly sell a $5 version of Windows for netbooks, although it won't be easy.

        Just imagine, it could be cheaper to buy a netbook with Windows, and then use the Windows license on your full-powered PC (leaving you with a perfectly Linux-ready netbook), than it is to buy Windows retail (or even OEM).

        Really, I think MS is much more vulnerable here. If you think about it, MS doesn't sell you anything tangible, just bits. At least Apple sells hardware. Once people stop seeing value in the bits (*if* that ever happens), MS has nothing to sell, and Apple does.

        • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

          by Phroggy (441)

          Just imagine, it could be cheaper to buy a netbook with Windows, and then use the Windows license on your full-powered PC

          Except, of course, that Windows OEM licenses are not transferrable between machines, so you can't legally run the copy of Windows that came with your netbook on anything other than the netbook it came with.

    • Re:Honeymoon is over (Score:5, Interesting)

      by greekBruin (998483) on Monday April 06, 2009 @09:43PM (#27483785)
      The article also mentions that: "Not only are people overwhelmingly buying Windows, but those that try Linux are often returning it," wrote Leblanc, noting that the United Kingdom's Car phone Warehouse dropped Linux-based netbooks after seeing return rates as high as 20%."
      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by Blackhalo (572408)
        "The article also mentions that: "Not only are people overwhelmingly buying Windows, but those that try Linux are often returning it," wrote Leblanc, noting that the United Kingdom's Car phone Warehouse dropped Linux-based netbooks after seeing return rates as high as 20%.""

        That does not make sense. The primary purpose of a netbook should be to launch a browser, the new API. If "netbooks" are being returned because they do not have windows, they were likely, not netbooks. ASUS pretty much created the
        • by schon (31600) on Monday April 06, 2009 @10:25PM (#27484101)

          IIRC Acer's VP said that returns of their Linux netbooks are 30% higher than the Windows versions, however ASUS's CEO says that return rates for EeePcs are the same for Linux models as for Windows [laptopmag.com]

          This probably reflects a difference between Acer and ASUS. Acer netbooks are sold as small notebooks, while the Eee aren't really sold as notebook replacements, but rather as their own, separate type of computer. Basically, people expect the Eee to be different than their Windows notebook or desktop, and so aren't immediately put off by the interface, whereas Acer customers are sold a "tiny laptop computer", buy the Linux version, and get upset when it's not exactly like what they're used to.

          • Because they might not be getting Windows but they SURE as hell ain't getting Linux either. I got one and I removed that piece of crap and installed a real OS as soon as I could put an image on a USB stick.

            Linux of course, arch linux if you must know, but something I control, not Acer.

            Linpus is horribly locked down and doesn't even have Firefox 3 by default. Updates are way to complicated. Sorry, but it seems like little more then those DOS machines Dell sells you because they have to supply an OS to kee

        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by jonwil (467024)

          I think what happened is that lots of people want a "portable computer" to do more than just access the web. They want something they can use to do word processing, spreadsheets and presentations (which for most people means Microsoft Office). They want something to connect to their email (which often means they need Outlook). Lots of people are sold on the idea of a device that can do these things that doesn't cost as much as a laptop (with some cellphone carriers offering bundles of netbooks and mobile br

      • Re:Honeymoon is over (Score:5, Informative)

        by Daengbo (523424) <daengboNO@SPAMgmail.com> on Monday April 06, 2009 @10:18PM (#27484069) Homepage Journal

        Car Phone Warehouse sold an early version of the MS Wind which came with Linux but which didn't have drivers for the wifi or webcam. Wouldn't you return that? Unless you were a Linux geek or installing Windows, I'm sure that you would.

    • by initialE (758110) on Monday April 06, 2009 @10:02PM (#27483927)

      It's a phyrric victory. They've sacrificed the perceived cost of Windows by selling it at rock bottom prices. And prolonged the lifespan of XP at the cost of Vista penetration. In mitigation, they impose a bunch of arbitrary restrictions on OEMs for selling XP - http://www.netbooknews.it/en/netbook-xp-ecco-i-vincoli-microsoft/ [netbooknews.it] for details.

    • by Lord Ender (156273) on Monday April 06, 2009 @10:29PM (#27484135) Homepage

      Linux beat Vista by infinity percent, though.

    • Re:Honeymoon is over (Score:5, Informative)

      by Locutus (9039) on Monday April 06, 2009 @10:38PM (#27484185)

      it wasn't Moore's Law, it was Microsoft financing and marketing kickback programs. Did you notice how Asus, after negotiating putting Windows XP on the EeePC they then changed the hardware such that the Linux versions were more expensive? We all know Linux distros easily run on anything Windows runs on but not the other way around. So Asus beefed up the hardware for the Linux models, beefed up the price, and then would only make 50% Windows based and 50% Linux based and some countries were no longer getting Linux versions at all.

      It was monopoly money that changed the netbook market share numbers instead of market demand defining those numbers.

      LoB

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by fractoid (1076465)

      Then Moore's law ticked over and Microsoft was able to enter that market - same price for the machine but with the specs that XP needs.

      Ah, but it isn't the same price. The original Eee PC was at a $200-$300 price point. These new "netbooks" are sometimes up to $1000 for a small-form-factor notebook, but they're completely different from the real "netbook", ie. a cheap-as-possible subnotebook that exists purely for internet browsing and possibly media playback. If it's got more grunt than is required to render a webpage or play back a DivX movie, then it's too expensive to be a netbook.

  • by cortesoft (1150075) on Monday April 06, 2009 @09:25PM (#27483639)

    Way to go Netbook! Getting to home base 96% of the time would make any frat boy proud.

  • Freebie? (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Ungrounded Lightning (62228) on Monday April 06, 2009 @09:25PM (#27483643) Journal

    How does Redmond make an 80% gain in netbook market share without the sales numbers reflecting that gain?

    By giving it away? B-)

    • Re:Freebie? (Score:4, Interesting)

      by AgBullet (624575) on Monday April 06, 2009 @09:44PM (#27483799) Journal
      Imagine a company sold 4 copies of some software last year, with 3 copies for desktops and 1 copy for netbooks. This year, they managed 1 desktop copy and 2 netbook copies. Overall sales are down 25%, but netbook penetration is up 100%. I think this kinda answers the question. Right? Or did I miss something? Dammit. Need coffee. Brane daid.
      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by pmarini (989354)
        Let's say there have been 10 millions netbooks sold before the "claim" period:
        - Linux: 3 millions (30%)
        - Windows: 7 millions (70%)

        Let's say that reaching the "claim" period" there have been another 20 millions netbook sold and that they were all (?) Windows-based:
        Totals: - Linux: 3 millions (10%)
        - Windows: 27 millions (90%)
        Let's even consider the 20% return rate for the Linux-based ones:
        - Linux: 2.4 millions (8.1%)
        - Windows: 27 millions (91.9%)

        Even if the maths is correct, their claim is higher t
  • by jeffmeden (135043) on Monday April 06, 2009 @09:26PM (#27483653) Homepage Journal

    How does Redmond make an 80% gain in netbook market share without the sales numbers reflecting that gain?

    That's easy, netbooks aren't sold in a comparable quantity, so a staggering increase of 80% reflects a tiny shift in the overall license count. Got any other braindead statistics questions for me?

  • by tpgp (48001) * on Monday April 06, 2009 @09:26PM (#27483661) Homepage

    Assuming that these figures are correct & MS has managed to grow their share of the netbook market....let's not forget:

    1) They had to keep XP around to do so.
    2) Linux has proved itself good enough that manufacturers will consider it.
    3) Pulling the same stunt on the rash of $150 arm-based netbooks that will be hitting the shelves later this year will be much harder.

  • by Myopic (18616) on Monday April 06, 2009 @09:29PM (#27483677)

    I wonder if they count my shiny new Acer Aspire One? Yeah, it came with XP, and yeah, XP is still on the hard drive, but I installed Linux on the first day, and have spent about 1% of my time in Windows since then. I would call that a Linux computer, but I suppose they call it a Windows computer.

  • by jmorris42 (1458) * <jmorris&beau,org> on Monday April 06, 2009 @09:29PM (#27483681)

    This isn't shocking at all. The netbook market isn't what it used to be, mostly I suspect because Microsoft AND the hardware makers recoiled in horror from what was happening. Look at the original netbook:

    Old cheap Celeron CPU
    7-9" Display
    2-8GB Flash storage
    512MB-1GB RAM
    Weight 1KG
    Price centered around $350 +/- $50

    Now look at what passes for a netbook:

    1.6Ghz Atom
    10" Display
    160GB HDD
    1-2GB RAM
    Weight 1-2KG
    Price $300 to $500

    The original specs couldn't run XP very well, and it wasn't an option. Vista was right out. So Microsoft brought back XP and everyone amped up the specs until it ran nicely. After all the new above average netbook was a kick ass desktop when XP was introduced.

    Add in the fact all of the major netbook makers also make notebooks and desktops and thus need Microsoft's good will and it is easy enough to see how most netbooks now ship with Windows. Anyway, at the current prices and specs they are more like small laptops anyway and pretty much 100% of those have always shipped with Windows.

    Wait for the ARM invasion. If hardware CAN run Windows vendors are always going to get pressured to load it. The ARM machines simply can't do it. Give a choice between a full Linux desktop, Android and WinCE and Microsoft's offering is going to come up a little short.

    Sooner or later we will see netbooks under $200 and that is where things will get fun. If they give out Windows licenses cheap enough to put it on sub $200 units it will either force an across the board cut in all OEM licensing or really tick a lot of people off.

  • 25$ Win XP? (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Blackhalo (572408) <jmattj@ix.ne[ ]m.com ['tco' in gap]> on Monday April 06, 2009 @09:31PM (#27483693)
    It should be interesting to see how MSFT will deal with a preference for a less expensive netbook compatible Win7 on non-netbooks. http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/04/06/microsofts-netbook-conundrum/ [nytimes.com]
  • by ShooterNeo (555040) on Monday April 06, 2009 @09:34PM (#27483719)

    This goes against the prevailing wisdom here, but Linux is not necessarily the best OS for netbooks.

    The newest netbooks have about as much CPU power and memory as a notebook computer made 3 years ago. That's enough to run windows XP and older Microsoft applications such as office 2003.

    And, Windows has the overwhelming advantage it always did : it has an enormous existing software library that still dwarfs that of Linux. An operating system is an enormously powerful natural monopoly. It's time to admit that the only way Linux or MacOS could ever pull ahead and have the diversity of software Windows has is if Microsoft royally screws up over a period of years. Windows ME didn't even scratch Microsoft's monopoly, because everyone kept using Win98, and it appears that Vista is the same way.

    Finally, I've heard many complain that the netbook manufacturers don't properly choose a good Linux distro and configure it with all the software a user is likely to ever need. If the manufacturers did that, pre-installing open office and VLC media player and firefox and the rest, and tuned the distro behind the scenes to run blazing fast on a flash disk, then Linux might have stayed a viable option.

    I would assume Microsoft has also adapated to this market : they must be offering a substantial discount on the software license for a netbook. Wouldn't surprise me if they were selling "XP for netbook use" for $20 a license. It could very well be that it is cheaper to pay Microsoft than it is to pay the technical support costs for Linux.

  • by wicka (985217) on Monday April 06, 2009 @09:38PM (#27483739)
    How many netbooks actually come with a full version of Linux? Admittedly I don't follow the latest netbook developments much, but most of the Linux models I've seen have some rainbows and unicorns OS that is only suitable for people under 10 years old.
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by Gothmolly (148874)

      You are totally uninformed. The Dell Mini ships with Ubuntu 8.04 (LTS) with a weird Dell interface, which can be disabled in 1 click.

  • by Shadow7789 (1000101) on Monday April 06, 2009 @09:57PM (#27483887)
    Let's not forget that Microsoft had to be dragged kicking and screaming into this market.
  • by ladislavb (551945) on Monday April 06, 2009 @10:16PM (#27484039) Homepage

    Last week I walked into no fewer than 20 different computer stores here in Taiwan (the home of ASUS, Acer, MSI, etc), big and small, in order to buy a Linux netbook. But despite the fact that some of them displayed as many as 20 different brands and models, I found exactly 0 (zero!) netbooks shipping with Linux. Zero, nada, nothing! It just doesn't exist any more.

    So yes, I believe Microsoft and its 96% figure. While people had choice between Linux and Windows, the figure was very different, but since the consumers are no longer offered a Linux option, even 96% seems low. The situation with netbooks is now exactly the same as with laptops - it's 2009 and it's still impossible to buy one without Windows pre-installed!

    I always have to laugh when I read news about EU suing Microsoft for bundling a browser or a media player with Windows, but fails to see the real issue - Microsoft's complete stronghold over hardware manufacturers. ASUS, Acer, MSI, Dell, HP - they all "recommend Windows for everyday computing" on their web sites. Out of their free will, no doubt...

    • by pimpimpim (811140) on Tuesday April 07, 2009 @01:30AM (#27485361)
      I think I see the reason. In Taiwan it's probably easy to get illegal installs of XP + all software when buying in small local shops- I know it happens in Russia. So the market for really free software is probably quite low. In Germany however, it is different. It is more difficult to sell computers with illegal stuff on it, and there is a substantially large group of pricky nerds that are in favor of linux for ideological reasons (and nationalist pride, suse started here). So at least in the small shops you can get linux netbooks, or notebooks with no OS preinstalled. And then there is Dell, where I bought my linux netbook via the german website.
    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by ignavus (213578)

      Out of their free will, no doubt...

      Nah, it's out of the kindness of their hearts ... they're kind of scared of Microsoft.

  • by IGnatius T Foobar (4328) on Monday April 06, 2009 @10:38PM (#27484189) Homepage Journal
    I maintain that a netbook running Windows, or even a standard Linux build, isn't really a netbook. It's really just a small, underpowered laptop.

    The whole point of netbooks was supposed to be that they *weren't* PC's, they were consumer electronics devices. Quickie access to the Internet, a little photo sharing and music playing ... all of the things that you didn't really want to drag out a PC to do, but didn't really want to cram onto a phone either ... and with a snappy operating system that boots up quickly and gets the job done without calling attention to itself. If you have to run Windows Update on your netbook to protect it from the worm-of-the-week ... you've totally missed the point.

    I'm more interested in the next generation of netbooks -- the ones that will cost $150-200 and run for eight or nine hours on one battery charge -- running low-power ARM and a designed for small form factor OS like Android. That generation of hardware will prove that a netbook isn't supposed to act like a PC. (And even if Microsoft weasels its way into that market by building Windows for ARM, they'll still find themselves at a disadvantage because x86 Windows software won't run on it. In fact, they'll even be faced with an unprecedented rate of customers returning them for just that reason.)

    Let PC's be PC's and let netbooks be netbooks. They're not the same thing.
    • by jav1231 (539129) on Monday April 06, 2009 @10:50PM (#27484259)
      "The whole point of netbooks was supposed to be that they *weren't* PC's, they were consumer electronics devices."

      Ummm...no that's apparently what you thought. If that were the case more of them would have shipped with such OS's. Wait, they didn't exist.
    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by 4D6963 (933028)

      Congratulations sir, you've successfully applied the problem-solving techniques pioneered by the Bush administration!

      1) Problem : 96% of netbooks run Windows
      2) Solution : Redefine "netbook" to exclude anything that runs Windows
      3) Problem solved : 0% of netbooks run Windows!!!

  • by Gordo_1 (256312) on Monday April 06, 2009 @10:47PM (#27484235)

    I got one of them fancy Samsung NC10 netbooks (Atom 1.6GHz, gig RAM, XP pre-installed).

    My OS of choice?

    Mozilla Firefox.

    At least that's where I spend 99% of my time on it.

    Aside from the fact that MS probably counts shipped units to come up with its "96%" claim, does it really matter whether Linux geeks or Microsoft (or both) claim me as a user? The underlying OS identity is about as relevant to me as the manufacturer of the 2.5" hard drive the unit comes with. I stuck with XP since it was the path of least resistance.

    Discuss...

  • by johnlittledotorg (858326) on Monday April 06, 2009 @11:00PM (#27484327) Homepage
    Hackers Boast 96% Netbook Penetration.
  • Not surprising (Score:5, Interesting)

    by ducomputergeek (595742) on Monday April 06, 2009 @11:15PM (#27484433)

    We had an internship for a group of college students over winter break. For completing their task, they each got an Acer Aspire One. Most of the students had 2 - 5 year old laptops and the freaking netbooks had the same speed processors with more ram, larger HDD (120GB), and even more Video Ram (32MB vs 8MB shared).

    Biggest complaints were lack of media drive and screen size. But after classes started again, they loved 'em. Perfect for taking notes and running most of their programs and they fit inside their backpacks without having to lug around an extra laptop bag.

    But again, they all wanted XP. (and were glad it wasn't vista)

  • by cenc (1310167) on Monday April 06, 2009 @11:34PM (#27484613) Homepage

    Yea, love my linux netbook. I am going to order another.

    If there is someone to blame in this mess, it is the netbook makers for insisting on putting their own bastardized versions of linux on them. Jut put one of a million stock distros on it, and provide the drivers. The community will do the rest. Once they figure that out, their profit margins for linux will double.

  • TFA title leaves something out, 96% of the netbooks in the US run Windows. Worldwide Linux runs 25% [computerworld.com] of the netbooks.

    Falcon

  • by viralMeme (1461143) on Tuesday April 07, 2009 @04:57AM (#27486423)
    "Citing figures from market research firm NPD, Microsoft says Windows' share of the US netbook market has ballooned from less than 10% in the first half of 2008 to 96% as of February"

    'Windows Is Not on 96% of Netbooks .. Brandon stated a number that may be true for U.S. retail for one month of sales [microsoft-watch.com] '

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