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T-Mobile To Launch Android Tablet 101

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the that's-one-big-ass-iphone dept.
nandemoari writes "T-Mobile is planning to use Google's open source operating system 'Android' on devices that blur the line between cellphone and home PC. In addition, Samsung says they will also produce Android phones, but need to work out the kinks first. Both announcements come shortly after HP revealed that it is investigating the idea of using Android to power some of its low-cost netbook computers in place of Windows."
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T-Mobile To Launch Android Tablet

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  • It's my understanding that Android is a mobile OS based in Linux [wikipedia.org] so why do we need to feature new phones? Can't we take an already popular model (like the Chocolate or Razr or whatever the devil it is the kids consume these days) and just compile it down to match the architecture and write the drivers for the devices on the phone?

    I mean, I've got Linux running on my Nintendo DS [wikipedia.org] from a community effort and it seems to support much of the DS' devices like the touch screen. You're telling me Google or Samsung or interested parties couldn't do the same for an existing phone? Am I missing something regarding hardware requirements? I mean, I know it uses Java libraries for the applications but a lot of existing phones should be beefy enough for that, right?
    • by tknd (979052) on Monday April 06, 2009 @03:38PM (#27480093)

      why do we need to feature new phones?

      Because the phone manufacturers and networks would love you to buy a new phone and sign a new 2 year contract. If they allowed you to upgrade your software, the only company that wins is Google.

      • by Zero__Kelvin (151819) on Monday April 06, 2009 @07:36PM (#27482855) Homepage

        "Because the phone manufacturers and networks would love you to buy a new phone and sign a new 2 year contract. If they allowed you to upgrade your software, the only company that wins is Google."

        Android is Open Source . Did you miss the memo?

        Google only wins if we win. It is a symbiotic, and very healthy relationship type known as interdependence, which you may want to read about here [wikipedia.org].

        Oh yeah, and one final thing. Google already won. We already won. I have a G1 running Linux with root access and the ability to cross-compile whatever kernel, libraries, and applications I want and install, boot, and use them.

        • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

          by Ihmhi (1206036)

          The problem isn't that "Google wins", but that "the people trying to sell you a new phone & contract lose".

          • Well, I'll see if I can get T-mobile to understand that later today when I stop in to pay my bill, but I think the fact that I shelled out the money for the G1 and renewed my contract as a direct consequence of the Andrioid project might make it hard for us to make our case ...
    • ...but it seems to me that there are probably rather specific requirements for an Android Phone in order to ensure compatibility across all the platforms (which seems counter-intuitive to the concept of an open platform...) Like they should all be touchscreen, have GPS, accelerometer, and have really good battery life and an efficient low-energy processor. Still, you would think that such phones could be found and equipped with Android. I guess everyone just wants something 'new' even if it is just th
      • by calmofthestorm (1344385) on Monday April 06, 2009 @04:43PM (#27480893)

        which seems counter-intuitive to the concept of an open platform

        Not at all. Android can't have drivers for a technology if there's no way for its authors to get their hands on specs, short of reverse engineering each piece of hardware which is prohibitively time intensive.

      • by pmarini (989354)
        you might be missing the concept of open in the context of hardware here...
        take a common base for a platform (be it software, hardware, food - yes, as in beer), then declare it "open" and release the specifications for it to be seen, modified and reused at will
        this obviously has the double advantage of letting people add or subtract parts, but you do either of these "operations" at your own risk...
        to give an example (different for the usual car one): take water, you can add CO2 and have fun or you can r
    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Yes we totally can do that. In fact, many people already have. The hard part is writing the drivers with no hardware documentation.

    • by Red Flayer (890720) on Monday April 06, 2009 @03:46PM (#27480205) Journal

      Can't we take an already popular model (like the Chocolate or Razr or whatever the devil it is the kids consume these days) and just compile it down to match the architecture and write the drivers for the devices on the phone?

      1. Joe Sixpack is gonna use whatever OS is on the device they buy.

      2. Commercial driver support is needed for this to avoid the hell that linux drivers can become.

      People using Android on a phone do not want to mess with the OS on their appliance. For adoption to happen, people must have a smooth transition, and a cobbled-together Android distro for $HARDWARE will turn off a lot of potential users.

      That said, do you really want an Android with a Razor? What could it possible need to shave?!.

      Or an Android with a Chocolate, or a Blackberry? My wife would leave me in a second for a robot that takes orders and comes bearing sweets.

      • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

        by zobier (585066)

        My wife would leave me in a second for a robot that takes orders and comes bearing sweets.

        Fortunately for you I'm already married -- what's that honey... OK, I'll have it ready in a minute -- GTG.

      • by fm6 (162816)

        If your wife does say she's leaving you for a robot, remind her of the sexual issues. I'm told their lovemaking is rather mechanical.

    • by xzvf (924443) on Monday April 06, 2009 @03:49PM (#27480231)
      A more important question is why Android? To answer my own question, it is marketing and the value of attaching Google to the phone. Doesn't matter that the phone runs Linux, what matters is the phone is attached to Google. It is an interesting shift in ownership of mobile phones. The iPhone is an Apple product, not an AT&T phone. Will Google follow the MS PC model and like Windows PC by Dell will become Android phone by Samsung?
      • namely, technology to encourage consumers to part with their cash, to develop brand loyalty (so that they part with their cash in the future), and to commit mindshare (so that the idea of parting with their cash to the makers of brand x is socially worthy).

        if you were to create a technology to do these three thing, people would call it marketing.

      • by Locutus (9039) on Monday April 06, 2009 @05:48PM (#27481747)

        I'm not sure the phone/OS being attached to Google is a big deal or game changer. What we're seeing is not phone vendors selling phones to the public but Telco's still selling phones tied to their networks. Apple controls the iPhone OS much like Microsoft controls the OS for some phones. but, the difference with Android is that vendors are allowed to take Android outside its basic design. For instance, Microsoft, for over a decade would not let vendors change the desktop UI phone users saw on their WindowsCE/PocketPC/Mobile phones. Only late last year after much complaining from one vendor did Microsoft allow the vendor to define what the UI looked like for the customer. Microsoft also dictated the screen resolution. Android give alot of power/control to the device or telco vendor and also provides alot of backend stuff with the application store end of it. Unfortunately, we're finding out that the Telco's are still given ways to block apps so Android is not yet the "user" friendly phone platform. Telco's like a massive amount of control and they are still getting it.

        LoB

        • by the_macman (874383) on Monday April 06, 2009 @10:53PM (#27484287)

          You've touched on something I've been trying to understand for a while. I'm a big proponent of OSS. When I first heard about Android I figured it would be similar to Linux except on my cellphone. From what I've seen it's the same old bullshit as usual. Tied to certain carriers, certain apps are blocked, etc.
           
          Would someone with an android phone or maybe an android dev explain what exactly is open source about it?

          • by Mr2001 (90979)

            From what I've seen it's the same old bullshit as usual. Tied to certain carriers, certain apps are blocked, etc.

            Would someone with an android phone or maybe an android dev explain what exactly is open source about it?

            G1 owner and hobbyist Android app developer here.

            Android is open source in that you can download the source code for the OS, recompile it, redistribute it with or without modifications, recompile it, bundle it with hardware you sell, and so on. Just like Linux. That means you can expect to see it on a lot of hardware, since companies can use it for the cost of porting (no license needed to get the code or distribute it).

            That doesn't mean the hardware is open source, though -- just like Linux. That's up to t

            • Google has unfortunately caved to T-Mobile's request to remove tethering apps from the Android Market (as seen by T-Mobile users, at least), but you don't have to use the Android Market anyway. You can install apps from any web site with the built-in browser

              It seems like a win-win to me; they've left the back door open so you can work around it while allowing them to at least pay lip-service to the request. I don't see how they had much choice, anyhow.

              the carrier could sell a phone with a version of Andro

      • by anothy (83176)
        what matters is that the interface doesn't suck.

        most mobile phones, from free up through the $300 models with WinCE on them, have just plain horrid UIs. the iPhone came along and, far from being perfect or even close to it, didn't totally suck. and people were amazed, and wanted to know why their phone didn't not suck. Android also doesn't suck, so now people will have more options. and the best thing the iPhone's done for the industry is making other manufacturers realize that, in the near future, their i
        • by mdwh2 (535323)

          most mobile phones, from free up through the $300 models with WinCE on them, have just plain horrid UIs. the iPhone came along and, far from being perfect or even close to it, didn't totally suck. and people were amazed, and wanted to know why their phone didn't not suck.

          Windoze suck! Amiga rulez!

          So you think they suck, and the Iphone doesn't - that's an assertion of an opinion, can you tell us why, with evidence or examples?

          As an example: my phone's UI doesn't suck. Good things about it are that it can cop

          • by anothy (83176)
            copy and paste is (was? what's the right verb tense with beta code out there?) a legitimate UI issue; app locking isn't UI.

            compare the SMS interface. the chat-like representation blows away pretty much everything else. application selection beat most things (on par with palm), scrolling beat pretty much everything, zooming beat pretty much everything, soft keyboard beat pretty much everything (despite still being the weakest part of the UI, imho), popup notification (even before 3.0 beat most things (and i
          • As an example: my phone's UI doesn't suck. Good things about it are that it can copy and paste, and if I want to run applications from a unofficial site, or use it as a modem ("tethering"), it doesn't need to be hacked (it Just Works). All good interfaces have objective reasons why they are good - I would be curious for some examples?

            So when talking about interfaces, you run off several features as evidence of why it doesn't suck?

            The parent wasn't talking about tethering, or running unofficial apps, he was talking about the interface (copy and paste is the only thing you mentioned which *is* a UI issue, and agreed it's crazy they didn't have it in from day 1 on the iPhone).

            Compared to Nokia, Motorola and Samsung phones, the UI on Android or the iPhone is far far ahead. Things like picture manipulation, app launching, tabs (on Android),

      • by mjwx (966435)

        A more important question is why Android? To answer my own question, it is marketing and the value of attaching Google to the phone. Doesn't matter that the phone runs Linux, what matters is the phone is attached to Google. It is an interesting shift in ownership of mobile phones. The iPhone is an Apple product, not an AT&T phone. Will Google follow the MS PC model and like Windows PC by Dell will become Android phone by Samsung?

        The Android OS is separate from the Hardware, in other words, the OS is a

    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by miknix (1047580)

      It's my understanding that Android is a mobile OS based in Linux [wikipedia.org] so why do we need to feature new phones? Can't we take an already popular model (like the Chocolate or Razr or whatever the devil it is the kids consume these days) and just compile it down to match the architecture and write the drivers for the devices on the phone?

      The motorola razr2 v8 already comes with Linux:
      https://opensource.motorola.com/sf/projects/razr2v8 [motorola.com]

    • The whole user interface is based around a touchscreen where you drag elements around. It would be pointless on a device with just a keypad.
    • Cellphone specifications are usually very closed. However, since HTC makes the T-Mobile G1, and its internals are very similar to HTC's other smartphones, it has been ported [androidonhtc.com] to some of them, although it is still a work in progress.
    • by demiurg (108464)

      Because mobile phone hardware architecture is far from being standard. There are too many options and no standards to speak off. It can have two processors (application and baseband), or one, or the two can reside on the same die. There multitude of buses and interfaces. It takes many man years to create a decent mobile phone (Openmoko anyone ?)

    • by Locutus (9039)

      you can do this in Europe because they have an open system and people buy phones and then pick what service they went to enable for this phone. You know, competition on performance of the network. Here in the US, it's all about the lockin and preventing competition. The Telco's sell the phones already customized and tied to their service so you have to buy the phones from them in most cases. You can find unlocked phones but they are usually 2+ year old models already or going out of production. Telco's don'

      • by Kadin2048 (468275)

        You can buy unlocked phones in the U.S., too. On AT&T's and T-Mobile's networks, there's nothing preventing you from doing it. Verizon and the other CDMA carriers are a bit tougher, and you do admittedly get mostly older phones on the secondary market there, but that's what you get for going with a proprietary, non-standard technology.

        I use T-Mobile and have bought my own GSM phones for years; sometimes I've chosen to buy phones that are a few years behind the bleeding edge because I'm a cheap bastard

        • by Locutus (9039)

          that's what I said in one sentence. The fact that people can't purchase the latest greatest phones for any network is a limiting factor. We'll see if Android eventually breaks that model in the US.

          LoB

    • "It's my understanding that Android is a mobile OS based in Linux so why do we need to feature new phones?

      .. and ...

      "Am I missing something regarding hardware requirements?"

      If you had a G1 or newer hardware, you'd have never asked the question, because you'd know that the second question's answer is yes, and in a big way .

      You might be able to run Android on the Motorola RaZr, but what would be the point?

      • No touchscreen
      • No GPS
      • No WiFi

      ... and that is just off the top of my head. I suspect the processing pow

    • screen a minimum size (bigger than most current cell phones)
      touch screen
      storage
      net access of some kind
      gps/compass/g sensors etc
  • Wouldn't this be more of a palm device than a tablet PC?
  • by Anonymous Coward

    I've been debating on learning to write software for the iPhone or the Android OS. I'm thinking if T-Mobile has a nice tablet PC based on Android that this will probably make me decide to go with Android since it uses technologies I already know how to work with.

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      Rhodes is a ruby framework that lets you write apps that run on all the major mobile platforms. While you won't be able to make a Quake port with it. For the many apps it's very suitable.
    • by LDoggg_ (659725)
      What type of applications are you intending on writing?

      For something like 3d games, you'll have to decide on a platform. If you're doing something that can be rendered in a browser but still requires hardware access, you might want to take a look at the opensource PhoneGap project. That way you can write in a somewhat cross platform way and target both android and iphone devices.
    • I'm thinking if T-Mobile has a nice tablet PC based on Android that this will probably make me decide to go with Android since it uses technologies I already know how to work with.

      The question you need to ask is, are you writing stuff mostly for yourself or for other people to use? Are you thinking to write something targeting the tablet specifically?

      On the iPhone, free or paid app you are going to get a larger user base.

      On Android, you are going to have a smaller number of people using the app but potenti

      • by CdBee (742846)
        Not sure I agree with this:

        "On the iPhone, free or paid app you are going to get a larger user base. On Android, you are going to have a smaller number of people using the app"

        OK right now there are more iPhones than Android phones out there. I bet in 3 years time Androids will outnumber iPhones by 3 to 1 or better, as there's just the one iPhone and the one carrier for it (usually) but a near infinite possible range of 'Droids..
        • OK right now there are more iPhones than Android phones out there. I bet in 3 years time Androids will outnumber iPhones by 3 to 1 or better, as there's just the one iPhone and the one carrier for it (usually) but a near infinite possible range of 'Droids..

          Yes, there will be many more Android phones in the next few years. However there are a ton of Windows Mobile phones right now, and that has not stopped the iPhone from surpassing them in sales. What I see in a few years is the iPhone OS having a command

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by mjwx (966435)

      I've been debating on learning to write software for the iPhone or the Android OS. I'm thinking if T-Mobile has a nice tablet PC based on Android that this will probably make me decide to go with Android since it uses technologies I already know how to work with.

      At this stage I'd go with Android simply because of the fact that there are more Android devices planed. From HTC the G1/Dream is released and the G2/Magic is slated for release mid year. Samsung have claimed to have an Android device out by EOY,

      • by Phoghat (1288088)
        I am loathe to buying all things Apple. Hey, I like bright shiny things as much as the next crow but don't want the Apple Tax attached to it. That being said, I take the subway in NY city to work each AM and when I see someone with a smart phone (usually a pretty young thing) I sit next to them and strike up a conversation by asking about their phone. EVERY damn one is an iPhone. These are the consumers. No one is interested in whether the software is open source, but they do like what it does and how it lo
        • by LDoggg_ (659725)
          "No one is interested in whether the software is open source"

          Of course not, but people do like free things. I'm hoping that the more Android devices come out, the bigger the market of free apps will get.
        • by mjwx (966435)
          Youre only noticing the iphone, there aren't actually more of them. It's like when you are at the beach and someone wanders along with their lunch hanging out (Lunch is Aussie slang for their wedding tackle) if you pretend that it doesn't exist it stops sticking out. After doing this I notice more Nokia E series (E71 is particularly popular in AU) and Blackberries then iphones as the E71's and blackberries are very popular in business. Also at a distance the iphone looks very similar to the ipod touch.

          I
          • by Phoghat (1288088)
            I read. A LOT. I almost exclusively read e-books on a Windows Mobile 5 device (paper is both heavy and wasteful). When I see someone reading something I ask what they're using. There is an ap to read books on the iPod, Blackberry and Nokia but I always seem to see iPods used this way. I'm only sayin'!
            • by mjwx (966435)
              Mobile phones are too small for me to read from, I need at least an A5 page to make it worthwhile. I'm beginning to see a few E-book readers on public transportation these days. They aren't Amazon Kindle's either given the fact that Amazon doesn't sell anything in Australia (Yes I can buy from Amazon US but the postage is a bitch). I'm waiting for them to drop in price.

              I like paper books, but only for things I want to keep, if I could have all my textbooks in E-book form I'd be very happy, as for my nove
              • by Phoghat (1288088)
                Point your magic browser to plasticlogic.com and see what they're coming out with at the end of the year. It will handle most formats of e books and in addition will also handle eReader books available at Fictionwise.com and other sites. BTW, Fictionwise has just been bought by Barnes and Noble so I think an e-book war is on the horizon.
  • Orthogonal (Score:5, Funny)

    by Pentalon (466561) on Monday April 06, 2009 @03:40PM (#27480113)

    > ... that blur the line between cellphone and home PC.

    I always wanted a desktop cellphone.

  • by MBCook (132727) <foobarsoft@foobarsoft.com> on Monday April 06, 2009 @03:43PM (#27480161) Homepage

    ...blur the line between cellphone and home PC.

    This doesn't seem like a good idea to me. I'll be happy to admit I'm wrong if they make something great, but this just strikes me as a device that we don't need.

    A cell phone (I've got an iPhone) is designed to be portable. I'm just not going to use a portable 8" tablet all the time. A cell phone should be small, but it's portable so I can whip it out at any time to look something up.

    Something larger, a home PC, is too big. Even if we take something like a netbook, it's bigger than something I want to carry around all the time. I don't think there are enough people who will want to carry something that size around all the time.

    I'd expect battery life to be a problem, at least if you want to keep it light.

    There may be a reason that people aren't rushing to buy stuff bigger than Nokia 810s. As other cell phones get more powerful and easier to use for the web, there doesn't seem to be a big reason to carry something bigger. You quickly get to the point where a netbook would fit you better.

    But something between a netbook and a cell phone? I'm skeptical of the size of that market.

    • After playing with various devices, I'm settling on 13" as my minimum screen size for "ordinary" web browsing, that is: web browsing where I might want to use the keyboard to type a comment or send an e-mail.

      Now, if you move to consumptive web browsing, such as playing Pandora radio, checking stocks and weather, reading e-mails without responding more than a very few words, reading news, etc., then that can be done on an iPhone sized device, although personally I'd like a little bigger screen, or at leas
    • by rcharbon (123915)

      When you're home, you plug the phone into a dock, with larger I/O. Duh.

    • by DeltaQH (717204)
      Women! You forget women!

      You have no idea what women carry on their bags.

      Room enough for a netbook, even battery back integrated in bag.

      Some integreated social network software and you have a new bussiness line in your computer production

      Dell? Apple? Are you hearing?
      • by mdwh2 (535323)

        An excellent point.

        And it will be interesting to watch 50% of the population miss out on new gadgets (or have to awkwardly carry them around), because they are constrained by centuries old social gender roles. (Or perhaps the old requirement about having to cram everything into a small pocket will finally be done away with - of course, they'll be "netbook bags", not handbags...)

      • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

        by AHuxley (892839)
        If a woman needs to use a computer, she just seduces a 20 something... and gets any task done correctly and for free.
        Thats where a few years of seduction experience is more useful than a 20 something's decade in moms basement.
        Woman can seduce their way onto any OS or system or network.
        Woman programme you and get to enjoy bags of any size.
    • by LDoggg_ (659725)
      Yes, it is a good idea.

      This would be nicer than a laptop for reading in bed.

      I really enjoy having a g1 phone, but I only put up with a 3 inch screen when I'm not near a full sized computer.
    • by pimpimpim (811140)
      Indeed, you can never cramp a comfortable screen size (say, starting 9 to 10 inch) in a device with the comfortable size of a cellphone. Still, I have nothing against my desktop PC and my phone having exactly the same OS. Not just the same type, really the same OS. It would make life terribly easy, syncing calendar data, music, etc.

      I'm almost there, I currently have only one PC, a dell-ubuntu mini 9. It is connected at home to my 20 inch CRT and an external dvd drive to watch movies (planning to add a bea

    • this just strikes me as a device that we don't need.

      Who is this "we" that you speak about?

    • I'd like to see a cellphone that you could plug into a wired jack.

      That would often let you make calls more cheaply and reliably. It would presumably use a lot less battery power, and you might be able to charge the phone off the phoneline. And you would have all your stored contacts, messages and whatnot in the phone, so you wouldn't have to rekey anything.

      It would probably need some sort of "locale" support, so that you could use different prefixes when dialling via the cell network or via the landline net

  • BTW, the HP article linked to is hosed.
    Try: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB123852934905974845.html [wsj.com]

    Why use Android on a netbook? Will we get the same vibrant community that the Asus Eee PC has - with many custom Linux distros available, most a vast improvement on the crap that Asus ships them with - with HP & Adroid?

  • by Locutus (9039) on Monday April 06, 2009 @04:12PM (#27480455)

    The CTIA 2009 conference was just a few weeks ago and there was almost no news on Android. Now we are hearing from many vendors who where there but showed and said nothing about these products. I even saw one post where a reporter had to ask about Android to find out they were going to ship an Android phone mid-2009. That same reporter noticed that this vendor was only announcing Windows Mobile 7 stuff at the show and _that_ wasn't even targetted for 2009.

    Now that we are starting to see/hear about Android products and phones, it really blows me away that businesses still let Microsoft sucker them into defining their marketing. I would not like to see Google or anyone else have to resort to paying customers to pre-announce and pre-promote their products to stall or diminish the value of the partners other products. But this is classic Microsoft and not any new and improved Microsoft. They've done this in the 80s and 80s so change is not in their blood. But what is up with these companies how let them do this and take their money while allowing them to dictate what their customers want, need, or deserve? Does $$$ really buy everything including the future of your company?

    It's good to see someone is finally talking about new product showing up this year. I still wonder what kinds of backroom pressure is being exerted to limit these kinds of things.

    LoB

    • by ckaminski (82854)
      It's why I'm convinced advertising is the curse of the 20th Century and the bane of the new millennium.
  • I think the next logical step is to bring to market something between the mobile/PDA and a netbook. I thought the 7" screen of the eeepc was more than enough for me.

    I want something small to bring with me to read the internet, check mail, write mail and do simple online tasks. What i dont want in any way, shape or form is a small Windows computer. I want it to just work and no computer has ever done that for me like a mobile phone can.

    An android phone with a bigger screen, about 5-6" would suite my needs pe

    • The pandora! It does all of these things, and is the size of a ds. And the best part is it might not even be varporware!
  • A small device with very long battery life. Also, the Android SDK with Eclipse plugins is a nice dev environment, so there may be lots of small usefull apps. That said, a tablet device might need different types of apps (e.g. geo location may not be of as much use?)

  • Here's what I'd like to see in a new tablet. But I doubt I'll see it.

    A4 or A5 sized screen
    E-ink or similar
    Touch-like/pen interface (maybe with a decent type of protection for the screen, like thin layer of glass)
    Slimmed down UI for browing and viewing documents. (Linux seems a safe bet here, even gives you access to better flash storage optimizations)
    Custom program for displaying pdf-files and the like, where you can write on top of the document. Doesn't have to do recognition, I just want to to put a secon

    • My wife works as an architect. They spend a lot of money on big printed plans, which get used during construction. A good sized tablet with e-ink would displace some of the use cases for printing, and provide a way for builders to get accurate information about the structure they are working on. I recall one argument with a builder over whether a thick line on the plan always denotes a fire rated wall.
    • Ah, well. I can dream, can't I?

      You could also relieve your wallet of it's contents. The iRex 1000 [irextechnologies.com] is pretty close. Pretty spendy (and mostly limited to Windows) as well. Keep dreaming.

    • by fm6 (162816)

      A4 or A5 sized screen

      In Amerispeak: letter-sized or half-letter-sized.

      I actually own a Motion tablet that's almost letter-sized. But I paid a stiff premium for it. Until this technology gets more commodified, I doubt that you'll see anything affordable.

  • Will Google's Android may be replaced by Microsoft Windows Mobile. But sure is the phone will more than now.

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