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HP Portables Hardware

HP Unveils Small Commercial Linux Laptop 242

Posted by Zonk
from the micro-penguins-on-the-go dept.
Ryan writes "HP had unveiled their version of a miniaturized laptop for school kids. The tiny device boasts speeds up to 1.6 gigahertz. They haven't yet decided on a name, but 'netbooks' is one possibility. They will be used for surfing the Internet and doing other basic tasks like word processing. The company plans to have 50 million units available in the marketplace by 2011. Optical drives have been left out to prevent kids from playing 'unauthorized games.' Weighing less than 3 pounds with a tiny 8.9 inch screen, the machines start below $500 for a Linux-based model. Prices are expected to be higher for Windows Vista models."
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HP Unveils Small Commercial Linux Laptop

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  • by JustinOpinion (1246824) on Tuesday April 08, 2008 @12:40PM (#23001822)
    From the summary:

    They haven't yet decided on a name, but 'netbooks' is one possibility.
    That implies that HP hasn't named their new device yet. Actually TFA describes it thus:

    The machines are so new the industry hasn't settled on a name for low-cost and scaled-down laptops used primarily for surfing the Internet and performing other basic functions like word processing. Intel has labeled them "netbooks," and it expects more than 50 million netbooks to be in circulation by 2011.
    And later,

    HP's foray comes in the form of a new computer called a "Mini-Note"
    So HP's new computer is a "Mini-Note"... and the "netbook" term is a possible buzz-word to describe generically a very small laptops (I guess UMPC [wikipedia.org] isn't sexy enough?).
  • hmmm. (Score:2, Informative)

    by WindBourne (631190) on Tuesday April 08, 2008 @12:45PM (#23001890) Journal
    They are late to the market and expensive with basically a clone of others. Sadly, It says a lot about the HP of today.
  • Better info (Score:2, Informative)

    by Sockatume (732728) on Tuesday April 08, 2008 @12:52PM (#23001988)
    It's called the Mini-Note. It's aimed at the education market in general as well as "mobile professionals", not just schools. It can be configured with SuSE, Vista Home Basic, or Vista Business, and storage goes from 4GB SSDs to 160GB 7200RPM hard drives (accelerometer-based drive protection features are included for the HDD versions). The Netbook is something else entirely, and is made by Intel. There are dozens of reviews of the machine out already with better info than that Yahoo article. The HP press release [hp.com] is a good start.
  • VIA CPU... no thanks (Score:3, Informative)

    by Dystopian Rebel (714995) * on Tuesday April 08, 2008 @01:03PM (#23002162) Journal
    Unless it has a math co-processor slot. Heh heh.

    Anyway, for the cost of any of these small notebooks, you can buy a used IBM Thinkpad X31 or X32 and have an Intel Pentium M (Banias/Dothan) CPU, top-quality components, and Thinkpad fit and finish.

  • by Bombula (670389) on Tuesday April 08, 2008 @01:10PM (#23002266)
    True. Most live in countries where the $500 pricetag of this product represents more than the GDP per capita. Do note that the 'G' in GDP stands for 'gross', as in 'not net', as in 'the chance of us having $500 to spend on this is roughly equal to chance of us becoming astronauts'.
  • Re:1.6GHz? (Score:1, Informative)

    by backpackcomputing (1249130) on Tuesday April 08, 2008 @01:11PM (#23002278)
    I don't think the 1.6 GHz CPU is worth paying extra for. The base model is $499, but for $549 you get 1 GB of RAM, 1.2 GHz Via CPU and Vista Basic. Importantly, you can opt to go with Windows XP and get a license for Vista so you can "upgrade" later. As far as the competition, Asus will be introducing an 8.9 inch screen on the Eee PC shortly and it may also include Intel's 45 NM "Atom" CPU. For more details and a link to purchase check out http://backpackcomputing.com/ [backpackcomputing.com]
  • Troll? (Score:5, Informative)

    by WindBourne (631190) on Tuesday April 08, 2008 @01:15PM (#23002326) Journal
    I have worked for HP and have always been proud of the past HP. It was a VERY inventive company. It always had a bit if NIH issue, but it also lead to interesting and new ideas.

    Copying other sub notebooks, almost to the T, but charging nearly double is NOT innovative. They are claiming to want to sell a 500 notebook into classrooms, which is way too expensive. The classmates are about 350 and the XO are 150-180. Heck, even the Asus are 299. It is slightly greater power then these, but still can not compete against other $500 notebooks (which have diskdrives, DVDs, Ram, 14-16" monitors, 2.2G and bigger CPU, etc.

    IOW, this item is either hopelessly overpriced or underpowered. That is NOT innovative and for me to call it for what it is, does not make me troll.
  • Re:1.6GHz? (Score:3, Informative)

    by bluemonq (812827) on Tuesday April 08, 2008 @01:28PM (#23002542)
    You are plain wrong. Vista will be offered with the C-7 1.6Ghz chips at launch. Units have been out for review for a while now; embargo dropped at midnight. Here is one such review: http://www.jkontherun.com/2008/04/jkontherun-revi.html [jkontherun.com]
  • by symbolset (646467) on Tuesday April 08, 2008 @05:03PM (#23005344) Journal

    packaged to minimize price, rather than maximize performance as has been the trend in personal computer sales for the past twenty years or more.

    The reversal of the trend is one thing that makes it new. Also, it's not just price. It's also weight and watts. Those two considerations in combination with the low price transform what people are willing the do with the thing, where they're willing to take it and hence how much they're able to take it for granted. It's not "The Precious Notebook" any more. It's just another ubiquitous appliance -- a lifestyle accessory like an iPod or satellite radio.

    Besides, if the folks that get these things didn't have PC's before its "new to them". Don't try so hard to pick a nit.

Premature optimization is the root of all evil. -- D.E. Knuth

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