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Ericsson Predicts Swift End For Wi-Fi Hotspots 286

Posted by Zonk
from the kind-of-in-their-interest-to-do-so dept.
mikesd81 writes "Mobile technology group Ericsson is predicting a 'swift end' for Wi-Fi hotspots, according to the PC Pro site. Johan Bergendahl, the company's chief marketing officer, offers this analysis: 'The rapid growth of mobile broadband is set to make Wi-Fi hotspots irrelevant ... Hotspots at places like Starbucks are becoming the telephone boxes of the broadband era. Industry will have to solve the international roaming issue ... Carriers need to work together. It can be as simple as paying 10 euros per day when you are abroad.' He also pointed to a lack of coverage as a potential hindrance to the growth of the technology."
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Ericsson Predicts Swift End For Wi-Fi Hotspots

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  • by mabhatter654 (561290) on Monday March 10, 2008 @07:39PM (#22709866)
    consider many wi-fi spots are free, and the most expensive are $29 (15E) per MONTH these guys are on crack. Even ATT is giving away wi-fi access to their paying DSL customers of premium packages.

    What they really mean is that Google's 700Mhz gambit will make paying more than $15 per month for a wireless device that's only a phone, or only Wi-fi go away... cleared that up!
  • Hmmmm (Score:3, Informative)

    by jawtheshark (198669) * <slashdot @ j awtheshark.com> on Monday March 10, 2008 @07:43PM (#22709938) Homepage Journal
    Hmmmm.... 10€/day versus 0€/day.... It's probably just me, but I'm going for the 0€/day option. Come on, even if you're abroad and get 2h of "free internet" at starbucks with a coffee for 2.5€, you have more than enough to stay in touch. Heck, my city has been "hotspotted [hotcity.lu]". For the moment it's 100% free....
  • by JonWan (456212) on Monday March 10, 2008 @08:01PM (#22710168)
    I have free wifi in my videostore and to generate a little extra money I put a few RV spaces on the lot behind the store. I offer my RV customers free wifi and many of them are here because I have it and other places don't. I don't keep my store computer on line except when I use it and it's on a different network anyway. The outdoor access point is a commercial unit that cost me about $200. All I have available is 1.5Mb DSL, but it works out OK.
    people visiting town will come by and get their email and sometimes even spend money here.
  • by e-Flex (1219042) on Monday March 10, 2008 @08:17PM (#22710300) Homepage
    Actually Ericsson does do hotspots: http://www.ericsson.com/ericsson/press/releases/20040921-961341.shtml [ericsson.com] Also I've seen them live at various locations around Sweden.
  • by bjourne (1034822) on Monday March 10, 2008 @08:21PM (#22710354) Homepage Journal
    While that is true, it is also true that the situation in Europe is very different from the US. Western European countries have large built out mostly under-used 3G networks so carriers offer fairly cheap access for mobile broadband. 7 MBit for 19/month is not that bad. And at least in Sweden, free wifi hotspots isn't that common. The fee at hotels is about 20/week and on the train it is 10 for a 5 hour ride. Both wifi and mobile operators are trying to screw you so you just have to roll with the one that manages to screw you the least.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Monday March 10, 2008 @08:44PM (#22710572)
    >the UK is EXTORTIONATE in comparison

    You think so?

    How about $6/mb [www.fido.ca]? Until just recently, that was considered "cheap" in Canada. I notice that within the past 3 months we finally have a 3G provider! Only $65/GB! How competitively priced.

    Especially since Canada had unlimited cellular internet about 5 years ago from Fido for $50/monthly. That went away once Rogers bought them. Quelle surprise!
  • by lars_magnusson (860066) on Monday March 10, 2008 @08:52PM (#22710622)
    Got one of those T-Mobile phones that does the VOIP deal when near a wi-fi network. As a side benefit he phone is great to have as a wi-fi finder, don't have to breakout the laptop just to check, and I find I wind up checking for wi-fi spots all over the place because of the nerd tendency to fidget. Tells me if the wi-fi spot is locked and signal strength, and if I want to connect the cell phone to the wi-fi network I'll do that too, usually at my favorite bar. In this case my cell phone makes is easier to find free wi-fi, fine with me.
  • by SirJorgelOfBorgel (897488) * on Monday March 10, 2008 @09:14PM (#22710754)
    What, 10 euros a day?

    Let's see, I pay 10 euros a month for unlimited (tethering allowed, no hidden bandwidth cap) 3G access on my phone here in Europe. Ok, it's only full UMTS, not full HSPA, but it gets the job done when I'm not on a 8-24 mbit line at home or work. That's 30 times cheaper than 10 euro's a day. What a strange 'simple' figure is that anyway, who spends 10 euros a day on mobile internet?

    As for the wifi hotspots, well to be honest I havent encountered many of them and I do live in a big city, but I haven't really searched for them either. I know the university and two or three of my favourite bars have them (never see people with laptops in there, but I imagine it's nice for others who have wifi enabled phones but don't have a data plan). Unsecured access points are everywhere.

    Roaming are awful though, especially here in Europe. You go somewhere near the border, you get the same provider but from a different country and suddenly you have to get a second mortgage to google. Glad the EU is looking into it.

    That being said, if you are waiting around somewhere and you need internet where your data plan isn't 'valid' (or you don't have one), you can make a wifi hotspot anywhere if you can find somebody with a phone and a data plan with WMWifiRouter [wmwifirouter.com] or JoikuSpot [joikuspot.com] softwares, depending on the type of phone they have.
  • by tricorn (199664) <sep@shout.net> on Monday March 10, 2008 @09:56PM (#22711078) Journal

    Even the $50 cheap wireless routers can isolate the wireless connections from the wired ports, or you get a second cheap wireless router for your customers, plug your business wireless (or wired) router/firewall/NAT into one of the ports on that, and you're isolated.

  • by Dice Fivefold (640696) on Monday March 10, 2008 @10:48PM (#22711394)
    What you don't understand is that Johan lives in Sweden, here mobile broadband has really taken off lately. Our operators is offering very reasonable, almost flat rate, high speed mobile broadband deals. For 30 $/month you get about 5-10 GB traffic/month, at up to 7.2 mbit/s download speed and 0.4 mbit/s upload. Many here cut their old land-based broadband and just use mobile. It really makes no sense to hunt for silly hotspots, when i can use my regular broadband where ever i wish to go, with no extra charge. So from a Swedish perspective, what he says is rather obvious. It is just a matter of time until this applies to the US and the rest of the world as well.
  • by jfengel (409917) on Monday March 10, 2008 @11:08PM (#22711516) Homepage Journal
    The summary misses the vastly more reasonable figure of 20 euros per month, already available and expected to come down.

    The ten euros a day figure is for international roaming, the most expensive kind of access.

    The article IS dumb, but it's not as dumb as the summary makes it sound.
  • by genericpoweruser (1223032) on Tuesday March 11, 2008 @01:28AM (#22712466)
    Bullshit. First and foremost, you're not stealing anything. It's more akin to enjoying music someone has playing on the boom-box in their window, or hell, even enjoying someone's shade--they obviously paid for the thing that's blocking the sun, you mooch. Second, by virtue of being able to connect in the first place, the hardware has acted on behalf of the owner to allow you to use their connection--the router says, essentially, "Here I am! My name is Linksys! Connect to me!" and your laptop says "Hi Linksys, gimme some internet access" and the router says (via DHCP) "you're good to go." Also, in the US at least, people buy unlimited (unmetered) access, so they would never even know or ever have to pay extra.

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