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Media Hardware

How to Convert Your HD-DVD Discs to Blu-Ray 275

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the but-what-about-how-to-do-it-on-linux dept.
eldavojohn writes "Are you one of the few who boarded the HD-DVD Titanic ship headed to the bottom of ocean to join BetaMax? Fret no longer, friend, simply convert those and pretend like you never invested in the wrong technology! All you need is a Windows machine with a fast processor, an HD-DVD drive, a Blu-Ray burner, 30GB of free disk space, at least, though 40GB or more is recommended and an internet connection to download the software! Or you can sit and be the crazy guy who continues to argue that HD-DVD is the superior technology whether it's true or not."
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How to Convert Your HD-DVD Discs to Blu-Ray

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  • Get a pen (Score:5, Funny)

    by CRCulver (715279) <crculver@christopherculver.com> on Wednesday February 20, 2008 @05:01PM (#22493568) Homepage
    This green marker I just bought at an audiophile shop for only a couple of hundred dollars (it was on sale!) is said to not only convert HD-DVD to Blu-Ray, but straighten the bits out so that my Dolby Surround sounds truly true-to-life. Now it's time to try it out.
    • by llZENll (545605) on Wednesday February 20, 2008 @06:06PM (#22494614)
      I can suggest another awesome upgrade, this $1700 power cable http://www.audioadvisor.com/prodinfo.asp?number=PSPREPC&variation=2.0 [audioadvisor.com], upgrade that normal power cable which powers your player and experience true video and audio nirvana, it really does work! Never mind the 500ft of unshielded romex inside your wall, its truley the last 6ft of power cord that does make the difference you will see and hear!

      Seriously if I ever see one of these in real life that someone has bought I will bitchslap them.
      • by NC-17 (411446) on Wednesday February 20, 2008 @06:13PM (#22494736) Homepage
        Brilliant pebbles. http://machinadynamica.com/machina31.htm [machinadynamica.com]

        Also, codename turquoise. http://machinadynamica.com/machina34.htm [machinadynamica.com]

        Yeah... Get out your bitchslapping hand.

        • (the product is blue construction paper that you cut out and glue to the cd tray)

          Normally, it is a somewhat laid back player. Not anymore. The music is so very much more alive, with detail now more up there with the rest of the music, making for a powerful and dynamic listening experience. I also feared that cutting the paper to fit would be a difficult job. Wrong again! I just had to experiment with laying the pieces on the tray in various ways then I knew what to do. Thanks so much for this incredible imp

      • by xaxa (988988)
        I like this bit:

        Removable Ground Pin
        The ground pin on a power cable is there to tie the ground of the AC receptacle to your equipment. However, in some cases, this ground pin can cause a ground loop and introduce hum and buzz in your system. AV enthusiasts often use an inexpensive three-prong-to-two-prong adapter 'cheater plug' to solve this problem and break the ground loop. Unfortunately, this adapter ruins many of the benefits of a high-end power cable like the xStream.
        PS engineers invented a better way.

        • Re:Get a pen (Score:5, Informative)

          by shawb (16347) on Wednesday February 20, 2008 @09:11PM (#22497028)
          60Hz (depending on the power source) hum in audio equipment is quite common, and not actually a sign of a bad ground. Removing the ground pin is the wrong way to fix it.

          The hum occurs because of an amplified ground loop. A ground loop is formed when the output of a grounded audio device is passed into an amplifier connected to the same ground. Shielded cabling will then ground the chaises of the signal device and the amplifier together, creating a closed loop between the devices and the electrical earth. This closed loop can then build up a 60hz cycle, I believe through induction with the power mains, but have not found a definitive answer. Normally this cycle is not enough to be electrically significant, except it is passed through an amplifier along with the desired signal. Removing the ground pin from one device will indeed open the circuit, preventing the ground loop from being able to cause a hum.

          However, as you surmised, disconnecting the ground from an electrical device can be dangerous. The accepted way to open the circuit is by breaking the ground connection between the amplifier and the signal device, generally at the amplifier rather than the signal source. Doing so will essentially eliminate the effectiveness of the cable shielding, but will also eliminate the loud 60hz hum which is generally much louder than any electrical interference you will find. However, the electrical ground of your electronics will not be compromised, saving the equipment and operator from damage in the case of a malfunction.
          • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

            by h3llfish (663057)
            >> disconnecting the ground from an electrical device can be dangerous. Yeah, I found that out the hard way. Back in my younger and stupider rock band days, I got a nice shock on the lips by playing electric guitar and then singing into a mic. It was an old house that didn't have 3 pronged outlets, so we just got those little grey adapters that defeat the ground. It hummed like crazy, and was a bit too "shocky" for my tastes.

            I had a conversation with my electrical engineer father, asking him abo
      • by Ucklak (755284)
        That would be $1,793.00 of pure power from romex to device.

        At least it is made of silver and at $17.91/oz, that's about a 6lb cable.
      • by RedK (112790) on Wednesday February 20, 2008 @08:27PM (#22496540)
        Bah, 1,793$ power cords are for chumps. This 12', 7,250$ speaker cable pair is what you really need :

        http://www.pearcable.com/sub_products_anjou_sc.htm [pearcable.com]
    • by cmacb (547347)
      Can't you just put them in the microwave and achieve the same results quicker?

      So, at what point I wonder does Microsoft announce another version of the XBox? Or are they all already too broken from overheating for anyone to care?
      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by HAKdragon (193605)
        Why would they need to introduce a new version of the Xbox 360? The HD-DVD player for it was an add-on, external drive. All 360s use DVD as the built in drive and as the medium for games.
  • by wattrlz (1162603) on Wednesday February 20, 2008 @05:01PM (#22493572)
    I seem to recall it was possible to dub your beta tapes to vhs back in the day too.
  • Oh is that all (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday February 20, 2008 @05:02PM (#22493584)
    Well as long as thats ALL you need.

    I dont have price quotes and I'm too lazy to look them up but I'm pretty sure that Blu-Ray burners run about $500. I have no idea how much an HD-DVD ROM drive would go for, probably pretty reasonable now that its a defunct format.

    So unless you bought a copy of every HD-DVD that is out I dont think this is cost effective.
    • Or just rip the disks and compress them..
    • Re:Oh is that all (Score:5, Insightful)

      by gEvil (beta) (945888) on Wednesday February 20, 2008 @05:09PM (#22493696)
      And don't forget that the blank BD media only runs about $15-25 a piece, too. That coupled with the hardware costs for the drives means you'll probably average about $30-40 a pop to replace a $25 disc. Good deal!
      • Re:Oh is that all (Score:5, Informative)

        by Dogtanian (588974) on Wednesday February 20, 2008 @06:09PM (#22494652) Homepage
        That's what I thought... unless you've shelled out for 100s of movies, wouldn't it be just more sensible (both financially and time-wise) to sell off your HD-DVD discs (and player) and rebuy them in Blu-Ray format? (The cost of the BR player doesn't count, as you'd have to buy one to watch transferred discs anyway).

        Or better still, since their value is already gone, sit back and happily watch your worthless HD-DVD discs like you would have done anyway. Replace them in a couple of years time when the current Blu Ray releases have come down in price substantially.

        Sounds better than shelling out for expensive blanks (and a burner, if you wouldn't have been buying one otherwise), especially when you're probably going to have to compress the film down to fit on a single-layer Blu Ray.
    • Re:Oh is that all (Score:5, Interesting)

      by esocid (946821) on Wednesday February 20, 2008 @05:12PM (#22493742) Journal
      From newegg.com:
      HD-DVD drive: US$149.99
      Blu-ray DVD burner: US$259.99
      Blu-ray DVD: 1xUS$13.99
      To a grand total of US$423.97
      unless you want to burn more than one DVD. Seems a bit much.
      • by allawalla (1030240) on Wednesday February 20, 2008 @05:27PM (#22493950)

        From newegg.com: HD-DVD drive: US$149.99 Blu-ray DVD burner: US$259.99 Blu-ray DVD: 1xUS$13.99 To a grand total of US$423.97
        Being glad that you waited until the format war was over: Priceless
      • From newegg.com:
        Blu-ray DVD burner: US$259.99

        Which model is that? The cheapest model I see [newegg.com] is $355.

      • by SeaFox (739806)

        To a grand total of US$423.97
        unless you want to burn more than one DVD. Seems a bit much.

        For that much you could just go rebuy your movies in BluRay, then sell the HD-DVD versions to the schmuck who is still disillusioned.
        Or for less you could go buy this [amazon.com] Sharp BluRay player (one of Amazon's best sellers) and keep your HD-DVD player and movies, too.

      • by HTH NE1 (675604)

        HD-DVD drive: US$149.99

        XBOX 360 USB HD DVD drive: $119.95

        And really, that's all you need: a backup player in case your first one goes kaput, until both the Blu-ray burners and Blu-ray blanks drop in price. Meanwhile, snatch up the dwindling commercial supply of discs as they go on fire sale. (Better than when DiVX went away as HD DVD is already cracked.)

        And BTW, it would look quite expensive for copying regular DVDs too if you had to buy separate new readers and burners for every disc you want to copy.

    • by JSBiff (87824) on Wednesday February 20, 2008 @05:26PM (#22493930) Journal
      Why the heck would I bother to convert the discs anyway? If I've got the hardware to watch the disc. . . why not just watch it in the native format? I mean, I guess if you have irreplaceable home videos (or you are an independent media producer) which are burned to an HD-DVD disc, and those are the *only* remaining extant copies of the video, you might do something like this.

      But for most users, why bother converting? Just keep watching it on your current player.
    • ... Blu-Ray burners will cost $50. Right now blank DVDs cost less than blank CD-R's at ly local Fry's. Go figure.

      However, as I understand it, Blu-Ray includes an extortionate per-blank disk licensing fee that artifically inflates the cost. That's way HD-DVD was cheaper and had more fans among low-volume disc producers.
  • by milsoRgen (1016505) on Wednesday February 20, 2008 @05:03PM (#22493608) Homepage

    All you need is a Windows machine with a fast processor, an HD-DVD drive, a Blu-Ray burner, 30GB of free disk space, at least, though 40GB or more is recommended and an internet connection to download the software!
    What about those of us that have HD-DVD drives in our home theater? The cost of a processor that would do this in a timely fashion, is no laughing matter. Plus an HD-DVD drive, plus a Blu-Ray burner? You're kidding right. If you had all that equipment to begin with, I'm pretty sure you already knew what to do in order to convert your discs. Sheesh!
    • by rworne (538610) on Wednesday February 20, 2008 @05:46PM (#22494270) Homepage

      What about those of us that have HD-DVD drives in our home theater? The cost of a processor that would do this in a timely fashion, is no laughing matter. Plus an HD-DVD drive, plus a Blu-Ray burner? You're kidding right. If you had all that equipment to begin with, I'm pretty sure you already knew what to do in order to convert your discs. Sheesh!
      You can do it with one unit. There is a combo HD-DVD/BDR drive available for PCs.

      LG GGW-H20L [lge.com]

      It's only one drive, so you'd have to rip & reburn.
    • by TheRaven64 (641858) on Wednesday February 20, 2008 @06:10PM (#22494682) Journal
      I didn't RTFA, but how fast a processor do you really need? You shouldn't need to recompress, since BD and HD-DVD both support the same formats, all you need to do is strip the DRM. That shouldn't be more CPU-intensive than playing the DRM'd file, and if you can play a HD-DVD in realtime on a moderately fast CPU, including decoding the VC-1 / H.264 decoding on top of the DRM decoding then you should definitely be able to copy it, removing the DRM, in 2x realtime which is as fast as the cheapest blank BD media I can find support...
      • That shouldn't be more CPU-intensive than playing the DRM'd file
        Playback does in fact require rather intensive use of your cpu and/or video card. And it should be noted that most people with stand alone HD drives are home theater enthusiasts, not necessarily very PC literate. They are the ones that would need a conversion most, yet also be the least likely to have the hardware on their home machine. But this is all moot, really just go out and buy new copies.
      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by rnelsonee (98732)
        ...you should just RTFA before posting. Dual-layer HD-DVDs (which is what a lot of the movies are) are 30 GB. Burnable Blu-ray discs are 25GB. If you know how to fit 30GB into 25GB without compression, please share.
  • Riiiiiiight (Score:2, Insightful)

    by Serenissima (1210562)
    Spend hundreds of dollars and hours of processing time and frustration. Or spend 30 bucks and buy the movie again...
    Hmmmm.... tough decision.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      Spend hundreds of dollars and hours of processing time and frustration. Or spend 30 bucks and buy the movie again...

      Or spend nothing and leave your HD-DVD drive plugged into your home theater, bitching occasionally about the extra remote. Or, have an HD-DVD drive that also is a regular DVD drive (or is plugged into your 360) and don't even have the extra remote. Seriously, why would I someone arbitarily deciding HD-DVD was bad impact me. Now that HD-DVD is "dead", I'm thinking about getting a player and

  • Money (Score:4, Insightful)

    by fishybell (516991) <fishybell AT hotmail DOT com> on Wednesday February 20, 2008 @05:04PM (#22493620) Homepage Journal
    Wow, so if don't to spend a few hundred repurchasing your movies, just several hundred (possibly thousand according to TFA) on hardware and software instead.


    I'm sorry, but HD-DVD users are just plain outta luck. Next time, join the rest of us and just wait.

    • Re:Money (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Professor_UNIX (867045) on Wednesday February 20, 2008 @05:19PM (#22493848)

      I'm sorry, but HD-DVD users are just plain outta luck. Next time, join the rest of us and just wait.
      That doesn't seem right though. Since you're just purchasing a license to the movie, why can't you mail your HD-DVD discs back to the manufacturer and have them be exchanged for a Blu-Ray copy of the same movie (if available) for a nominal fee (say, $5 plus reasonable shipping and handling)? Perhaps Congress needs to get involved and sort this mess out so HD-DVD users don't get screwed out of their investment... it certainly adversely affects lives more than steroid using baseball players or the war in Iraq. Write your Congressman today and demand an HD-DVD exchange program be setup immediately!!!
      • by longacre (1090157) *
        I, for one, have met more professional baseball players and Iraq veterans than I have HD DVD owners.
      • Re:Money (Score:5, Insightful)

        by Trogre (513942) on Wednesday February 20, 2008 @05:44PM (#22494222) Homepage
        ...adversely affects lives? Are you kidding? These are just movies!

      • Re:Money (Score:5, Insightful)

        by llZENll (545605) on Wednesday February 20, 2008 @05:58PM (#22494470)
        "Perhaps Congress needs to get involved and sort this mess out so HD-DVD users don't get screwed out of their investment"

        Yes, I would much rather have Congress dealing with peoples HD-DVD issues than the economic toilet our country is in, the war, oil, or about a 1000 other more important issues.

        HD-DVD users are not screwed in the slightest, they knew what they were getting into, and even so, getting a new disc format isn't going to jack squat for them. They can watch their HD-DVD discs on their HD-DVD player for the rest of thier lives just fine, how is getting a Bluray disc of the same movie going to help them when they don't even have a Bluray player?
      • >That doesn't seem right though.

        We're talking about the MAFIAA and you expect what's right? (I'm chuckling even while I write this.) I hate to be the one to break the bad news to you, Grasshopper, but you have discovered the ugly core of the media industry. It has nothing to do with what is right. It's not about Art. It is all about squeezing as much money as possible out you as possible. And if you think your congresscritter is going to do otherwise, then I applaud your pure heart, but feel compelled to
      • Re:Money (Score:5, Insightful)

        by thelexx (237096) on Wednesday February 20, 2008 @06:15PM (#22494764)
        Back in the mid-80's, I did just that with some game software when I went from a C64 to an Atari ST. Can't remember if it was Origin or SSI, think it was one of those though. And IIRC, all I had to send them was the front page of the manual. You would probably get laughed at today.
      • by brouski (827510)
        This is snark, right? Are you under the impression that your HD-DVD discs will self-destruct as a result of this announcement?
      • Re:Money (Score:4, Insightful)

        by RetardsForRonPaul (1175873) on Wednesday February 20, 2008 @06:16PM (#22494784)
        I'd rather have Congress repeal the DMCA so decrypting the HD-DVDs I own isn't a crime.
      • Sod off.

        I'm about as socialist as anyone can get, but even I know this is child abuse. Seriously, HDDVD buyers knew what they were getting into. it's no secret that there was a format war, and that HDDVD might not be sold anymore. it's not like DiVX where once the servers go offline, the discs are nearly useless.
      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by Charcharodon (611187)
        "Investing" in tech that is for entertainment purposes is roughly on par with betting on a horse race.

        Your horse lost, now you want your money back? That seems a bit silly.

        The only thing Congress should do is laugh at you.

        I got caught picking the loosing side too, but all my HD DVD's are safely ripped to my server where they'll live for some time to come.

      • "Perhaps Congress needs to get involved and sort this mess out so HD-DVD users don't get screwed out of their investment..."

        Sure. And while we're at it, we'll get Congress to get involved every single time a technology fails to gain ground. We'll go after companies that stopped supporting Laserdisc, 8-Track, Betamax, and all of the gas stations that stopped providing leaded gasoline for my '72 Dodge Dart.

        People bought HD-DVD during a format war. Why in heaven's name should they be protected from the
      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by Steve001 (955086)

        Professor_UNIX wrote and included with a post:

        I'm sorry, but HD-DVD users are just plain outta luck. Next time, join the rest of us and just wait.

        That doesn't seem right though. Since you're just purchasing a license to the movie, why can't you mail your HD-DVD discs back to the manufacturer and have them be exchanged for a Blu-Ray copy of the same movie (if available) for a nominal fee (say, $5 plus reasonable shipping and handling)? Perhaps Congress needs to get involved and sort this mess out so H

  • Or (Score:4, Insightful)

    by RetroRichie (259581) on Wednesday February 20, 2008 @05:04PM (#22493630)
    Or you could just keep your HD DVD player.
  • Kind of worthless? (Score:2, Insightful)

    by aikouka (932902)
    Even as it states in the originating Wired DIY Wiki page, "Also, consider just buying the movie new: a blank Blu-Ray disc is from $15-$25 for write-once media." (Note that we are also not considering the money for the BR burner).

    Now, I'm no studio exec, but the chances that a studio will re-release in Blu-Ray or put out old Blu-Ray versions (movies such as Shooter that were pulled from Blu-Ray once Paramount went HD-DVD exclusive) is fairly decent. This sounds like a huge time and money sink to me and for
    • by antifoidulus (807088) on Wednesday February 20, 2008 @05:42PM (#22494188) Homepage Journal
      Yeah, but part of it is the principal of the thing. The real reason behind DRM isn't an attempt to stop piracy, it's a way to get you to purchase the same content over and over again. I am more than willing to pay a fair price for music/movies, but I am only willing to pay it ONCE. After scratching up a couple of DVDs(and losing a whole season of the Simpsons) I finally decided to rip all my dvds with handbrake and store them on an external drive(backed up and streamed over my airport express). First and foremost its more convenient as I can just pick up my Apple remote and watch any movie/tv show I feel like(of course Apple gimped front row but that is another rant) Secondly unless there is a fire(in which case insurance will cover the cost of the dvds anyway) I won't have to repurchase any dvd because it got scratched or lost when I moved etc.

      I abjectly refuse to buy any media more than once, its the game they have played since there was more than 1 media choice out there, and that cash cow has got to stop.
      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by mr_matticus (928346)
        Well, it's principle, and you'd be faced with the same problem irrespective of DRM. I know the moderators are too dumb to stop and think about what's going on here and would rather just groupthink their way into any attack on DRM, regardless of the situation, but one can hope, can't he?

        These discs are fundamentally different formats. DRM isn't what makes this not cost effective. DRM isn't the reason why your HD-DVDs don't work in a Blu-ray player.

        Every time in the history of recordings that there has bee
  • by imstanny (722685) on Wednesday February 20, 2008 @05:06PM (#22493652)
    Unless you have a vast HD-DVD collection, getting a Blu-Ray burner, blu ray dvd media, as well as the time investing into converting it's likely not worth it. I think it'd be cheaper to setup a stream from your HD capable computer to your TV...
    • by llZENll (545605)
      At $20 per blank bluray disc and a shitload of wasted time, I think you are better off just buying the movie again. I think the OP is a joke.
      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by HTH NE1 (675604)
        Skip the BD-Rs, skip the Blu-ray burner, keep the image in HD DVD format and put it on your media server.

        Amazon lists 566 HD DVD titles. Many of them are duplicates of others bundled in box sets, some are hybrids with a reduced capacity, a lot are pre-orders and many are presumed future release not available for pre-order. But let's assume single-disk single-side dual-layer HD DVD content on average and they're all full at 30 GB each, that's 16,980 GB. At current prices of 1 GB for 20 cents (sometimes less
    • by Lumpy (12016)
      How about the insane idea of not only keeping the HDDVD disc, but the player you bought for them as well! you could go even farther and keep it hooked up!

      I know rich video guys that still have their laserdisc player in their home theater setup because they own 100 laserdiscs.

      The cheapest and best solution is to ignore silly things said by silly people and keep using what you have already.
  • by Anonymous Coward
    ...Doesn't mean you didn't invest in the wrong technology. Unless you bought a PS3, that is. All other Blu-Ray lite (tm) Profile 1.x devices (which means everything else) are as good as a motherboard with ISA slots. Doesn't matter if that motherboard has a 3 trillion Ghz CPU on it if it only works with last year's (okay, decade's) stuff.

    It'll take time, but this is the Achilles heel of Blu-Ray, and will eventually continue the legacy of Sony developed media standards taking off like a lead balloon.
    • by blugu64 (633729)
      Could you explain this a bit more?
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by GauteL (29207)
      "All other Blu-Ray lite (tm) Profile 1.x devices (which means everything else) are as good as a motherboard with ISA slots. Doesn't matter if that motherboard has a 3 trillion Ghz CPU on it if it only works with last year's (okay, decade's) stuff."

      That is just bullsh*t. The motherboard with ISA slots is completely useless, the older Blu-Ray players will still play the new Blu-ray discs, they just won't do the extras.

      Yes, losing out on the extras is annoying and crap, but playing the f*cking film is the most
  • What's the point? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Kuukai (865890) on Wednesday February 20, 2008 @05:07PM (#22493680) Journal
    TFA doesn't mention if these will play on a standalone Blu-Ray player or what. It seems pointless unless you really want to throw away your old (new) HD-DVD drive...
    • by vanyel (28049) * on Wednesday February 20, 2008 @05:45PM (#22494246) Journal
      There weren't enough interesting titles released on HD-DVD to make it worth the time, I'll just go buy the 2 discs again when they come out in Blu-Ray.
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by tlhIngan (30335)

      TFA doesn't mention if these will play on a standalone Blu-Ray player or what. It seems pointless unless you really want to throw away your old (new) HD-DVD drive...

      Well, just make sure you use the BDAV profile (the "dumb" collection-of-videos mode).

      Only BDMV (mastered movies) discs are an issue in playing back in standalone machines. Since you're not supposed to be mastering these except to test before pressing, you shouldn't have an issue.

      Unless your standalone player supports BDMV on writable BDs.

  • With the cost of blank Bluray disks and assuming you have BOTH a HD DVD and Blu ray drive in your computer you might as well just re-buy your movies on bluray when they come out, if not out already.
  • by Sabz5150 (1230938) on Wednesday February 20, 2008 @05:28PM (#22493972)
    Convert your HD-DVDs to Blu-Ray for 24.99 each. They'll even throw in a sleek blue case and an insert sheet!
  • by elrous0 (869638) * on Wednesday February 20, 2008 @05:42PM (#22494194)
    Why would you need to do this when you presumably already on a HD-DVD player. It's not like your HD-DVD player is going to just turn into a pumpkin at midnight tonight and stop playing your HD-DVD's. And, even if it did ever break, it would be MUCH cheaper and easier to just buy a used HD-DVD player (you can get the Xbox 360 add-on for $130 new) than to go to the huge hassle and expense of converting them to blu-ray.

    Who exactly is this article meant for? Some fictional person with a buttload of HD-DVD's but no HD-DVD player or goddamn sense?!?

    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by Dogtanian (588974)

      It's not like your HD-DVD player is going to just turn into a pumpkin at midnight tonight and stop playing your HD-DVD's.
      I think that's because the HD-DVD players lack network connections.

      I have it on good authority that Sony are going to send the "convert to pumpkin" firmware upgrade to all networked PS3s this coming Monday.
  • by steppin_razor_LA (236684) on Wednesday February 20, 2008 @06:25PM (#22494946) Homepage Journal
    Given the cost of blank media (not to mention the burners), it doesn't make sense to convert your HDDVDs to BluRay. Assuming you have a computer connected to your TV, I'd propose instead ripping the DVDs to a HD (or storage array). You can connect a 360 HDDVD drive to a computer and do this.

    You can get a 500GB disk for ~$100. This will hold ~25 movies and will probably provide a superior playback experience (i.e. no need to swap out disks).

    Eventually HD prices as well as BluRay optical media prices will drop ...

  • Why bother? (Score:2, Insightful)

    Wait, if you need both a HD-DVD and BluRay drive to do this, why exactly do you need to bother? It isn't like your HD-DVD drive is going to stop working or anything. When you want to watch a HD-DVD, use your HD-DVD drive!
  • compusa (Score:2, Informative)

    by yodleboy (982200)
    some of the compUSA joints closing up have been unloading BR blanks for as low as $2/each... I just got a ps3 this weekend, finally figured it was safe to pick a format. About damn time.
  • Cheaper (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Nom du Keyboard (633989) on Wednesday February 20, 2008 @06:53PM (#22495318)

    All you need is a Windows machine with a fast processor, an HD-DVD drive, a Blu-Ray burner, 30GB of free disk space, at least, though 40GB or more is recommended and an internet connection to download the software!

    I think it would be cheaper to just re-buy all your discs in BluRay, especially considering the cost of BR recordable discs.

    Or if there is no BR equivalent, get a fire-sale HD-DVD player just for those obsolete discs.

  • by argent (18001) <peter.slashdot@2006@taronga@com> on Wednesday February 20, 2008 @06:53PM (#22495336) Homepage Journal
    The last line of this article ends "whether it is true or not". It should read "whether it is relevant or not". The failure of HD-DVD has nothing to do with whether it is superior or inferior, but to market forces. There have been any number of situations over the years, centuries, and millennia, where technically superior products and technologies have failed (whether to be reborn later, in some form, or not) in the face of chance vagaries of the market.

    Note that I am not arguing that it is superior, I neither know nor care since I have no interest in the technology itself and no media in either format, simply suggesting a significant improvement to the way the comment is phrased.
  • BD9 (Score:4, Interesting)

    by DrXym (126579) on Wednesday February 20, 2008 @06:58PM (#22495420)
    Blu Ray supports 9 & 4.7 Gb DVDs with the proper disc structure. So in theory you could transcode an HD DVD to a DVD. Quality wouldn't be as good as the original but its probably watchable. Alternative just store the movie data on a removable USB drive and watch it on a PS3.
  • All you need is a Windows machine with a fast processor, an HD-DVD drive, a Blu-Ray burner, 30GB of free disk space
    hmm, you invested in HD-DVD and Windows?
  • I have an HD-DVD player ($200), and have purchased a few discs (about $100). I made the purchases knowing it could be the losing format, but was willing to try it out for the cost. I agree, without complaint, that the thing to do is buy Blu-ray replacements for the few titles I have. It is the easiest and most economical thing to do.

    Here is the kicker: One of the titles was Led Zeppelin's 'The Song Remains the Same'
    This title was supposed to be released in December on both formats. Come the release date, s

  • My brother in laws Betamax player still works.

    Are we to understand that the HD DVD player is in danger of crapping out if we don't hurry up and convert?

    Wouldn't it make more sense to buy all the movies you like that are available in the obsoleted format along with a player because now you can get them cheap?
  • But it's only cheaper if you already own the HD DVD ROM drive and the Blu-ray burner; and you wait for the price of blank Blu-ray discs to come down. Unless you own every single HD DVD movie that was made, it's probably going to be cheaper to just re-buy the movies on Blu-ray.

    The only thing I will miss are the combo DVD/HD DVD discs. I liked the idea of being able to play the same disc on my older 'kids' TV and my notebook computer, as well as on the HD DVD Player in full quality. (Of course, I have only

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