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The Almighty Buck Hardware

Toshiba To Halt HD-DVD Production 494

Posted by Soulskill
from the one-format-to-rule-them-all dept.
Multiple users have written to tell us that Toshiba is planning to halt production of devices related to HD-DVD. According to Japanese broadcasting network NHK, Toshiba will lose "hundreds of millions of dollars" as the format war finally draws to a close. Regardless, investors are pleased that Toshiba has made the decision to cut its losses. This comes after a last-ditch price cut was unable to prevent Wal-mart from throwing their lot in with Blu-ray, although some sources suggest that Wal-mart was already aware of Toshiba's plans to withdraw from fight.
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Toshiba To Halt HD-DVD Production

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  • by Anonymous Coward on Monday February 18, 2008 @06:24AM (#22461024)
    Blu-Ray is so much easier on the tongue than a mouthful of acronym(s).
    • by ledow (319597) on Monday February 18, 2008 @06:27AM (#22461044) Homepage
      Yeah, they would have been much more accepted if they had pronounced it "Heidi DVD". :-)

      I always think the funniest acronym is PXE UNDI - it sounds like fairy knicker to me.
      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by mrxak (727974)
        But HD DVD doesn't sound stupid. It says exactly what it is, and doesn't embarrass itself. Blu-ray, besides being spelled incorrectly, says nothing about what it is. Whatever happened to the glory days of Video Home System, Compact Disc, and Digital Versatile Disc?
        • by Eivind (15695) <eivindorama@gmail.com> on Monday February 18, 2008 @07:21AM (#22461350) Homepage
          Nobody gives a fuck. Ok ?

          90%+ of average consumers don't have any clue whatsoever what "VHS" stands for, and couldn't care less.

          For that matter, most consumers couldn't tell you what "HD" stands for either.
          • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

            by Anonymous Coward

            Hot Damn!

          • Hard Drive? >_> That's what I used to identify it as anyway ;)
          • by Jon_S (15368) on Monday February 18, 2008 @09:55AM (#22462328)
            I'm still amazed at how many times I hear, *on the radio* that HD-radio stands for "High Def" radio. Ibiquity [wikipedia.org] has a great scam going there.
          • by IGnatius T Foobar (4328) on Monday February 18, 2008 @11:17AM (#22463188) Homepage Journal

            90%+ of average consumers don't have any clue whatsoever what "VHS" stands for, and couldn't care less.
            And those who do, probably think it stands for "Video Home System" -- a backronym created by a bunch of marketing types.

            An even smaller percentage know that it actually stands for "Vertical Helical Scan," a technical acronym which describes the physical tape format and transport.
            • by Just Some Guy (3352) <kirk+slashdot@strauser.com> on Monday February 18, 2008 @01:11PM (#22464718) Homepage Journal

              And those who do, probably think it stands for "Video Home System" -- a backronym created by a bunch of marketing types.

              That's because they're right. VHS has been Video Home System [wikipedia.org] for decades, probably since its consumer launch (and certainly at least soon afterward).

              The engineers might have called it "vertical helical scan", but it wasn't ever widely marketed that way.

              • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

                by Blkdeath (530393)

                And those who do, probably think it stands for "Video Home System" -- a backronym created by a bunch of marketing types.

                That's because they're right. VHS has been Video Home System [wikipedia.org] for decades, probably since its consumer launch (and certainly at least soon afterward).

                The engineers might have called it "vertical helical scan", but it wasn't ever widely marketed that way.

                Erm, that means the acronym actually stands for "vertical helical scan" my friend. Making up a new meaning for an acronym doesn't change its original meaning. Hence the term used by the OP "backronym" - an explanation that won't scare the neophytes who purchase the technology.

        • by Escogido (884359) on Monday February 18, 2008 @07:47AM (#22461516)

          But HD DVD doesn't sound stupid. It says exactly what it is, and doesn't embarrass itself. Blu-ray, besides being spelled incorrectly, says nothing about what it is. Whatever happened to the glory days of Video Home System, Compact Disc, and Digital Versatile Disc?
          Are these all *that* much better than BR really? I agree that unlike BR they give people a vague idea what they are about, but you honestly don't expect people to instantly understand what either of them implies anyway. Think of it, if you never knew what a Digital Versatile Disc is, what'd you imagine it to be? A disc with digits on it that can be used as a lot of other things? :)

          It's more like a product trademark to me: you don't complain that the word Panasonic is 'better' than say Toshiba, just because Panasonic literally means pro-sound and Toshiba is a compound noun where To- means Tokyo, and what -shiba is I forgot. But that doesn't still make Panasonic any 'better'.
        • by flajann (658201)
          "DVD" use to mean "Digital Video Disc" initially. But really, if you don't know what "Blu-Ray" is by now, you must live in a cave somewhere....
        • by ozamosi (615254) on Monday February 18, 2008 @07:52AM (#22461546) Homepage
          It's a feature.

          Digital Versatile Disc is a backronym - DVD originally meant Digital Video Disc, until they realized how stupid the name actually was ("Yeah, this game is distributed on a video disc. But it's not really a video..."), at which point they just redefined the abbreviation. When I think about it, I realize that HD-DVD's name is just as stupid: you can have just as High Definition audio/video or interactive media on HD discs as you can on "SD discs", just not as much.

          By not having a meaning, blu-ray avoids that problem - a blu-ray disc is a disc that uses blue rays.

          I do think that CD is a good name - it tells me what it is (a disc that's quite small, compared to LP's), not what they developed it to contain. But CDSDWEMRFDTDVD (Compact Disc-sized Disc With Even More Room For Data Than Digital Versatile Discs) doesn't have such a nice ring to it... Of course, today it's more of a Big Disc, compared to Minidisc or mini-DVD, which again shows that neutral names are better.

          To finish off, let me just counter your "glory days" argument by saying "BetaMax" and "Video2000".
          • by Metorical (1241524) on Monday February 18, 2008 @09:20AM (#22462030)
            [rant]

            This is not insightful, you've just made up facts, so you're forcing me to finally sign up.

            I visited Samsung back when DVD technology was still in the labs and their guys were very keen to show it off. They all referred to it as a Digital Versatile Disc. Remember at this point you couldn't buy a DVD in the stores and data DVDs became mainstream a long time after videos.

            Also for it to be a backronym then it couldn't have been an acronym beforehand. From dictionary.com:

            backronym jargon
            (Backward acronym) A word which has been turned into an acronym

            or

            n. [portmanteau of back + acronym]
            A word interpreted as an acronym that was not originally so intended.

            [/rant]
            • by rtechie (244489) on Monday February 18, 2008 @06:44PM (#22468554)

              I visited Samsung back when DVD technology was still in the labs and their guys were very keen to show it off. They all referred to it as a Digital Versatile Disc.
              He's not wrong. The SPEC was originally called "Digital Video Disc" and it was changed to "Digital Versatile Disc" during development. However, the term Digital Video Disc was widely used in promotional materials, particularly by the DVD Forum. So "Digital Video Disc" became semi-official. You can still find new discs labeled Digital Video Disc. I saw this on some DVD-Rs I bought the other day.

        • by ceeam (39911) on Monday February 18, 2008 @08:21AM (#22461714)
          You mean "Vertical Helix Scan" and "Digital Video Disc"? (and I like these original "decodings" better)
        • by drsquare (530038) on Monday February 18, 2008 @08:42AM (#22461816)
          HD-DVD doesn't tell you what it is. From the name, I'd assume it was a normal DVD with HD content on, that could be played by hooking up a normal DVD player to a HDTV. With blu ray you know it's a different format straight off. And five fucking syllables...
    • PCMCIA (Score:5, Funny)

      by smitty_one_each (243267) * on Monday February 18, 2008 @09:08AM (#22461962) Homepage Journal
      People Can't Memorize Computer Industry Acronyms.
    • by Tony Hoyle (11698) <tmh@nodomain.org> on Monday February 18, 2008 @10:17AM (#22462554) Homepage
      Blu-Ray is so much easier on the tongue than a mouthful of acronym(s).

      I'm not sure something that can be (and frequently is) pronounced 'Blurry' is a great name for an HD format either...
      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by pnewhook (788591)

        Frequently? never heard that before - sounds like product bashing from the HD-DVD fanboys.

  • Toshiba will think twice next time when it comes to forcing competing formats on consumers. Maybe other manufs. will also learn something and fight this stuff out in the labs rather than hope for luck by trying to confuse consumers again and again.

    Now if we can convince England to use the euro and drive on the right side of the road we can at least pretend to be a modern civilization :)
    • by Jafafa Hots (580169) on Monday February 18, 2008 @06:27AM (#22461046) Homepage Journal
      Exactly. When will huge multinational corporations stop forcing competition down people's throats and realize that what consumers want is monopolies, lack of choice and the resulting high prices!
      • by terjeber (856226) on Monday February 18, 2008 @07:07AM (#22461268)

        Why is it that people conflate competition and competing formats? There was more competition in the Blu-Ray camp than there was in the HD DVD camp. Toshiba was dumping players, but there was still no real competition, Toshiba was the only (real) manufacturer. You can have competition when there is a single standard, no problem. There is, for example, competition in the DVD business, always has been. Are there more than one DVD format? Did the DivX fiasco add value for the consumer?

        The format war would have made sure we had continued high prices for a long time to come since the war it self slowed down adoption. With slow adoption both consumers and producers will tend to do a lot of fence sitting, and that is not good for anybody since it takes longer to get to the benefits of economics of scale. Everybody but pirates benefits from this war being over.

        • by robosmurf (33876) * on Monday February 18, 2008 @07:21AM (#22461364)
          Except that the Blu-ray specification is such a mess that there is exactly one Blu-ray player on the market that is worth buying as it will be properly compatible - the Playstation 3.

          The Playstation 3 has outsold all other high-definition disc players on the market put together by a huge margin. This is the only machine that disc manufactures will make sure is fully compatible.

          If this situation continues, and the other manufacturers don't drastically improve their performance, then Blu-ray is set to become almost as proprietary to Sony as the UMD.

          • by The13thSin (1092867) on Monday February 18, 2008 @08:29AM (#22461752)

            The current 18 board members (as of January 2008) are: [blu-raydisc.com]

            • Apple Inc.
            • Dell Inc.
            • Hewlett-Packard Company
            • Hitachi, Ltd.
            • LG Electronics
            • Mitsubishi Electric
            • Panasonic (Matsushita Electric)
            • Pioneer Corporation
            • Royal Philips Electronics
            • Samsung Electronics
            • Sharp Corporation
            • Sony Corporation
            • Sun Microsystems
            • TDK Corporation
            • Thomson SA
            • Twentieth Century Fox
            • Walt Disney Motion Pictures Group / Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment
            • Warner Home Video Inc.

            Like the PS2 was one of the biggest DVD players in the beginning, the PS3 will be the biggest Blu-ray player... that is untill in 1 1/2 year a $100 Samsung / LG profile 2.0 Blu-ray comes on the market.

          • by gEvil (beta) (945888) on Monday February 18, 2008 @09:45AM (#22462220)
            Except that the Blu-ray specification is such a mess that there is exactly one Blu-ray player on the market that is worth buying as it will be properly compatible - the Playstation 3.

            And even that one isn't feature-complete with regards to the audio codecs that BD supports. To the best of my knowledge, there isn't a single BD player out there that supports the full range of options that are in the BD spec.
      • by Kris_J (10111) * on Monday February 18, 2008 @07:12AM (#22461304) Journal
        I don't want more choice, I just want better stuff.
      • Fail... (Score:5, Insightful)

        by sgant (178166) on Monday February 18, 2008 @08:56AM (#22461888) Homepage Journal
        So there should be two formats or even more out in the world to give a choice for consumers? A choice to not buy either until one format wins so they don't get left with obsolete hardware where nothing new is going to be released on?

        How about this, every studio comes up with their own format! That way, there's tons of choices for the consumer! Want to watch a Univeral or Paramount movie? You have to buy a special player to play their formats. Think of the possibilities! Think of the competition! Think of the illegal downloads because no one would want to put up with that bullshit!

        I think your analogy needs work.
    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by garlicbready (846542)
      I've heard they're going to phase it in
      Heavy Goods Vehicles / Trucks for the first month on the right side
      then cars / bikes later on
    • by IBBoard (1128019)
      On topic: Sony obviously haven't learned that, since they had BetaMax, Mini Disks and something else proprietary that escapes me at the moment and yet they still went in to the HD fight with BluRay.

      Off-topic: We do drive on the right (correct) side of the road, it is just those strange foreigners who insist on driving on the wrong ('right-hand') side of the road ;) As for Euros, all I can say is "funny money" - it looks like you've pilfered your Monopoly game for extra cash!
      • by Anonymous Coward
        "On topic: Sony obviously haven't learned that, since they had BetaMax"

        Which enjoyed better success in professional [wikipedia.org] settings.

        Mini-disc became Mini-HD [wikipedia.org]

        Memory stick is still being used. [wikipedia.org]

      • by Charcharodon (611187) on Monday February 18, 2008 @07:14AM (#22461320)
        Left, right it doesn't really matter. I took me all of two weeks to stop feeling weird driving on the left and a month to stop making random right lane errors.

        The only thing that I find unfamthomable is the use of some of the colors on the road.

        For example they only use white paint for the lines. In the States they use white and yellow. You can tell the difference real quick which lanes are for your direction of traffic (white) and which is the divider line (yellow). I've had more than a few moments of panic where I could not tell for the life of me which lanes were which.

        I take that back there are two things about driving in the UK, the second is do you people believe in F'ing street/road signs? Considering that the names of the streets change every 3 blocks and they don't run in a straight line more than 25 yards at a go, it would be simply amazing to have both the street and the cross street names on a sign, you are lucky just to even have a cross street that you can see from the road you are travelling on.

        I foresee a GPS in my immediate future.

        • by CmdrGravy (645153)
          Have a look at the highway code - the type of line designates which lanes you can go into and when, various dashes, solid lines etc or failing that assume it's a single carriageway unless you see the sign that specifically says "Dual Carriageway" that they put before all dual carriage ways. On motorways there are 3 lanes and a metal barrier between each direction.
    • by 0xdeadbeef (28836) on Monday February 18, 2008 @07:35AM (#22461444) Homepage Journal
      Toshiba will think twice next time when it comes to forcing competing formats on consumers.

      I bet you post comments on YouTube.
    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      >Toshiba will think twice next time when it comes to forcing competing formats on consumers
      Quite how ths got marked inightful is a mystery. HD-DVD is (or now, was) the official standard for HD and was sanctioned by the DVD standards body, the DVD Forum. BluRay was the non-standard bully boy. After all the previous wars, the whole point was there is a DVD standards body who decide upon updates and new features in conjunction with the various manufacturers - SOny decided to go off on a tangent (again) but
  • by plierhead (570797) on Monday February 18, 2008 @06:25AM (#22461036) Journal

    This is of course great news (that the war is over - nothing to do with who won), but having forked out for a Blu-Ray disc lately (running around $50 over here) I can honestly say that I wish I had not fallen for the blandishments of that sales guy who told me I should buy a smaller, but much higher definition, TV.

    If I had my buying decision over I would say after the initial technogasm brought on by seeing every hair on the actor's heads, you very quickly forget about the quality and just wish your screen was bigger. (Apparently this is a common effect.)

    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      by sqrt(2) (786011)
      Depends what your needs are. I wouldn't have use for a TV above 32 inches or so on the high end, it wouldn't be practical for the space I have. If you have a much larger room with a big space in between then you'll want a 42 inch or even larger because you're simply sitting farther away. So with a small space to get a better picture you want a higher resolution, with a big room you want a big picture (and high res too but that's probably secondary in terms of viewing experience).

      I'm happy I decided to wait
  • by TheVelvetFlamebait (986083) on Monday February 18, 2008 @06:40AM (#22461118) Journal
    May there be a niche market of stupid rich guys waiting for you up in heaven.
    • by mrxak (727974)
      Well, I was definitely rooting for HD-DVD. I mean seriously, wtf kind of name is Blu-Ray? Still, that's not really to say that I wanted either format to win. I'm really hoping they both don't sell all that well, and we get a newer better technology in a few years with a decent name and a standard everyone can agree with.
  • by beset (745752) on Monday February 18, 2008 @06:47AM (#22461156) Homepage
    And in other news, satan is ice skating to work today.
  • I'll still turn to Toshiba for relevant hardware needs. The company laptops are Toshiba, and they're solid, reliable machines.

    And since Sony stuck that effing rootkit on their CD's, I decided I will never, ever voluntarily have anything to do with that company again for any reason. The last Sony hardware I saw was a kind of "all in one" stereo system some department store sold to my great aunt. All design, all plastic, no performance. For what she paid, it sucks. Too bad...they used to be the gold s

  • So... (Score:3, Funny)

    by VirexEye (572399) on Monday February 18, 2008 @06:57AM (#22461224) Homepage
    Did Sony *finally* win a format war...?!
    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by draxredd (661953)
      yeah. floppies, CDs and Hi8 were such miserable failures, after all.
    • by robosmurf (33876) *
      It looks like it. Though it remains to be seen whether Blu-ray will make significant headway against DVD, or will flop like SACD.

      In fact, if Blu-ray is successful, then this could be a major victory for Sony. With the complexity and compatibility problems of the Blu-ray specification, the Playstation 3 is pretty much the only Blu-ray player worth getting. I predict other manufacturers are going to struggle to produce Blu-ray players that can compete.
  • by Schmiggy_JK (867785) on Monday February 18, 2008 @06:59AM (#22461236)
    The real competition is DVD. HD media isn't doing terrible by any means, numbers wise it is doing better than DVD was at this time in its life cycle. However DVD sales are dominating both HD formats. And thanks to this competition prices should continue to be reasonable as HD adoption hasn't taken over yet. Thus this lone single format should be good for HD business, and for consumers.
    • by Eivind (15695)
      Sure. The real competition is DVD and downloading. I think there's a real chance that DVD will be the last physical format to achieve market-dominance. There's no real reason we need to mess with physical formats at all, sure files need to be stored -somewhere- but exactly where can safely be left to the consumers.

      Music is already like that. Some store their music as round plastic-discs. Others on a hard-disc. Others on flash-based music-players or any combination of these. It doesn't matter. It's the same
    • The real target should have been DVD-R/DVD-RW. With computers are where you can be reasonably sure the monitors on them are HD quality. Being able to write ~50GB instead of 8GB would be the killer app.

      VHS sucked. Rewinding/forwarding sucked on VHS (although DRM-crap on DVDs sure is trying to make it hard to sabotage a paying customer's experience with ads/fbi_warning/regioning). It was the same difference between cassette and CDs.

      Notice that music didn't move to Music DVDs. It went straight to digital.
      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by afidel (530433)
        LG has a dual format writer that can be had for as cheap as $327 [google.com]. I couldn't find a burner that only supported HD DVD for any cheaper.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Monday February 18, 2008 @07:05AM (#22461254)
    I was kind of hoping HD DVD would win this one, now we'll be stuck with region locked movies for another decade till the next thing comes along.
    • by robosmurf (33876) * on Monday February 18, 2008 @07:29AM (#22461406)
      It's even worse than that: at least with DVD region-free players were available easily almost from the beginning.

      With Blu-ray, almost all Blu-ray players in existence are Playstation 3 consoles. As far as I'm aware, no one has managed a region-free version of this.
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by DrXym (126579)
      The reasons HD DVD lost are many but one of the was lack of region encoding. As a consumer region locking sucks big time, but it's important for studios. Just consider a movie like Ratatouille or No Country for Old Men. Both of these appeared on Blu Ray in the US while they were still showing in cinemas in Europe. It suited Disney's model to encode the disks. Other titles might have different distributors in different regions so lack of region coding could cause all sorts of issues. I know as a consumer the
      • Both of these appeared on Blu Ray in the US while they were still showing in cinemas in Europe.

        The solution here is to set sane release dates for stuff (both in cinema and on disc) instead of locking out your customers (also, there are a lot of suggestions that region coding is an illegal restriction on free trade... shame no one's sued the studios yet).

        Honestly, if you release stuff in one country before another, you really can't complain when people take it upon themselves to import it (through legal or illegal means).
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      Just as a comment about region encoding, the PS3 isn't region encoded for Blu-Ray films (I've yet to try games). I've got a couple of region 1 Blu-Ray films for my region 2 PS3 and they work perfectly fine.

      The PS3 is only region encoded for DVDs and PS2 games.
      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by tenton (181778)
        Just as a comment about region encoding, the PS3 isn't region encoded for Blu-Ray films (I've yet to try games). I've got a couple of region 1 Blu-Ray films for my region 2 PS3 and they work perfectly fine.

        The PS3 is only region encoded for DVDs and PS2 games.


        Seeing as Region 1 and Region 2 aren't the Blu-ray regions, I'll have to ask where the discs and PS3 are from?

        For example, if by Region 1, you mean USA and by Region 2, you mean Japan, be aware that those two areas are now in the same region, for Blu-r
  • by reybrujo (177253) on Monday February 18, 2008 @07:08AM (#22461274) Homepage
    Gaming sites report that Toshiba hasn't given up [gamesindustry.biz] yet. I guess they want to deplete their HD-DVD hardware before killing the format.
  • I think that the PS3 is largely responsible for this outcome. I've heard it cited in numerous reports as a major driver of blu ray sales, so even though it's been disastrous otherwise, the PS3 may have actually paid off for Sony in a way most people didn't expect.
    • Re:PS3 Success? (Score:4, Insightful)

      by MosesJones (55544) on Monday February 18, 2008 @09:29AM (#22462104) Homepage
      Its an interesting definition of disastrous to say that the biggest selling HD console has been a disaster, and as for the idea that bundling Blu-Ray into the box wasn't a smart move this has been cited from the beginning as a major issue with XBox 360 in that while MS backed the HD-DVD standard they didn't integrate it into the box because of the desire to get the console to market quicker. This led to a market in which one "HD" console has HD level movie content (and similarly large available storage on its gaming disks) and the other has an after point of sale device with no gaming advantage.

      Anyone who thinks this wasn't part of the strategic play for Sony and that having the cheapest Blu-Ray player on the market won't help PS3 sales is looking at this from a purely gaming perspective.

      Wii remains the family console, Sony is now the HD player and the "pretty" graphics console option.

      The biggest question is now where this leaves XBox as it is in a real bind as to how quickly they role out a Blu-Ray player extension to stop people buying the PS3 to get Blu-Ray and whether they release a new XBox 360-HD edition that has Blu-Ray baked in.
  • With rather an expensive, obsolete drive, lacking in film titles to play and games being produced on a media that now has no economy of scale. Mind you, it should make piracy a bit more difficult!

    However, I think it's going to be a long road for BluRay to get to a point where it will move past DVD, and it will take far longer than DVD took to move past VHS. Arguably, DVD only really accelerated in popularity when people realised that they could be copied, the purchase of blank DVD media and DVD writers t
    • by grumbel (592662) <grumbel@gmx.de> on Monday February 18, 2008 @07:51AM (#22461536) Homepage
      The Xbox360 doesn't have a HD-DVD drive it has a normal old DVD drive. The HD-DVD is an extra thing that you have to buy and place next to your XBox360, Microsoft will simply release a BluRay extension drive. For games it doesn't matter, since neither is used in games.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      When you say 'obsolete' drive, are you talking about the built in DVD, which they chose for the data speeds (allowing, for example Devil May Cry 4 to be as fast to load as it is on the PS3, which has a *20+ minute install routine* or are you talking about the external and optional HD-DVD drive?

      If HD-DVD truly is no longer being produced, we'll see an external Blu-Ray drive for the 360 before year's end. Knowing Microsoft, it's been ready for mass-production for at least a year.

  • For Sale (Score:5, Funny)

    by PinkyDead (862370) on Monday February 18, 2008 @07:41AM (#22461486) Journal
    1 HD-DVD Player, never used. Best offer accepted.

    (Please...)
  • This is all that matters to me. the rest can sort itself out over time. twice the storage space is all you need to know.
  • BD-R Prices (Score:3, Insightful)

    by TrevorB (57780) on Monday February 18, 2008 @08:25AM (#22461726) Homepage
    The only thing I care about is the cost of BD-R (Blue Ray Writable). We've been waiting a very long time for a replacement for DVD-Rs, and DVD-R9 at decent write speeds are only now becoming both affordable and practical (compared to DVD-R5).

    I figure my BD-R threshold is about $5 per disk. Presently they seem to be going for $15-$22 per disk. I'll be willing to buy a BD-R reader/burner when 25GB single layer BD-R's are at $5, which interestingly is the price of CD-Rs when I finally decided to make the switch from floppies in 1996. That was a 450 fold increase in media size. CD-R to DVD-R was a 6 fold increase. I'll be content with another 6 fold increase.

    Hopefully BD/BD-R support for MythTV will be available by then.
  • Betamax wins! (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Zebra_X (13249) on Monday February 18, 2008 @10:05AM (#22462424)
    Back in the day, beta was the superior format - at least from a quality perspective. VHS won out because... we'll I don't really know - I was too young.

    I own an HD-DVD player - but the Blue-Ray *disk* format is superior and more extensible than the HD-DVD disk. Blue-ray will increase in capacity with time, as it was designed to do. HD-DVD didn't really have this in mind it was for the most part, easier to implement and designed specifically for carrying HD video content. Blue-ray carries with it an entire execution environment within the player - one of the reasons for the difficulty that vendors have had complying with the specification.

    Note that the disk format has nothing at all to do with the content format. Almost all HD-DVD's contain SMPTE VC-1 content, but there is a mix of VC-1 and H.264 within Blue-ray disks. Blue-ray and hd-dvd are capable of playing other stream types.

    The "Blue-ray" logo really represents just a particular disk format and a player that has a certain set of capabilities.

    Glad to see the non-noob tech prevail.
  • by Hangtime (19526) on Monday February 18, 2008 @10:59AM (#22463014) Homepage
    I refused to get in the middle of HD DVD vs. BluRay and refuse to catch BluRay now that this supposed war is over. The BluRay format has bounced around like a damn super ball and No I am not buying a Playstation 3 for the purposes of watching movies. I want a machine that will remove my need for my upconverting DVD player and above all else the format and player are solid, finished, and done. Versioned software 1.1, 1.2, 2.0 is good. Versioned hardware is bad. Somebody wake me when Sony is tired of tinkering and actually settles on the final standard. No, having new features become available for new hardware isn't an option all it does is screw the original purchasers (take a look at 1.0 spec players).

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