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Apple iPhone Dissected 338

Posted by CowboyNeal
from the better-them-than-you dept.
Conch writes "Only hours after the launch, the Apple iPhone has been dissected. The good folks at AnandTech violated one of the first iPhones to still our curiosity about whats inside the aluminum shell. 'Please note that we're doing this so you are not tempted to on your recent $500/$600 expenditure, while it is quite possible to take apart using easy to find tools we'd recommend against it as it will undoubtedly void your warranty and will most likely mar up the beautiful gadget's exterior.'"
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Apple iPhone Dissected

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  • by stefanb (21140) * on Saturday June 30, 2007 @08:33AM (#19698757) Homepage
    at ThinkSecret [thinksecret.com]. Plus they didn't destroy the case :-)
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by Gwwfps (912993)
      They did destroy some stuff inside though, which didn't happen here [ifixit.com], from the looks of it.
    • by RDW (41497)
      It really ought to be be illegal in all Geek Jurisdictions to publish this sort of thing without a corresponding set of pictures detailing the reassembly (to as-new condition).

      'And he that breaks a thing to find out what it is has left the path of wisdom' - Gandalf.
  • What's that? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Whiney Mac Fanboy (963289) * <whineymacfanboy@gmail.com> on Saturday June 30, 2007 @08:33AM (#19698759) Homepage Journal
    That noise - as if millions of fanbois suddenly cried out in shock and were suddenly silenced. I fear something terrible has happened....

    Joke's aside - the thing I really noted from TFA was:

    The big yellow thing in the middle is the iPhone battery; you're definitely not replacing this thing on your own
    More planned obsolescence. Pity. I'd like to see Apple go a little greener. A non-user replaceable battery limits the life of a device substantially.
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Svippy (876087)

      More planned obsolescence. Pity. I'd like to see Apple go a little greener. A non-user replaceable battery limits the life of a device substantially.

      You know as well as I, that Apple likes to keep control of their own things. And besides, it is not like there would be any business in a normal mobile store to sell iPhone batteries, whereas selling for instance Nokia batteries could be a good idea, because a lot of phones from Nokia uses the same batteries. I think even across brand names are the same batt

    • by Cordath (581672) on Saturday June 30, 2007 @08:52AM (#19698827)
      Have you ever changed the battery in an iPod? It's possible, but a royal nuisance. Anyone who has done so probably realizes that Apple never really intended it to be possible. With the iPhone they've taken it a step further by soldering the battery directly to the board. I think that says it all. The only question is whether or not the battery will live up to daily use long enough to last out the contracts people are signing themselves into.

      From the pictures on anandtech, it appears that the iPhone uses a Li-poly battery. That's an interesting choice, but a concerning one. Those typically do not last for as many charges as a plain old lithium ion battery. Apple is probably counting on the fact that the people who will lay out the kind of money the iPhone costs are the sort who won't try to nurse a device on for years, but rather, are the sort that will bin said device as soon as the next greatest thing (Hopefully the next generation of iPhone) comes along.

      I suppose in this light it's not really planned obsolescence. Apple just built the iPhone to the minimum specs of the fickle trendy gadget crowd.
      • by DarkVader (121278) on Saturday June 30, 2007 @11:37AM (#19699723)
        So it takes a soldering iron to change the battery. That's not exactly making it a challenge for most people on Slashdot, right?

        And it's not like we're going to have any real trouble sourcing a battery either, all the usual iPod battery suppliers will have them.

        I'm really not sure why people keep whining about the battery thing. That's really the least of the iPhone's problems as far as I'm concerned.

        My list of why I won't buy one now, and maybe not ever:

        1. I don't know if it will tether. If it won't, dealbreaker.
        2. EDGE - I have an EDGE phone now. It's too slow. If 802.11 worked where I needed my phone to access the internet, I wouldn't need my phone to access the internet.
        3. Javascript is not an SDK.
        4. Not enough storage capacity to be useful as an iPod. I wouldn't mind at all having a hard drive in my phone, I want 80GB, not 8.
        5. I don't do 2 year contracts.
        6. This thing is useless without activation. If I decide I don't want Cingular, it's not even an ipod, it's a doorstop.

        I don't hate Apple, I make Apple computers work for a living. I'm typing this on an iBook. But it looks like my next phone will probably be a RAZR v3xx, not an iPhone. And if the iPhone would do what I want, I'd be all over it.
        • by confused one (671304) on Saturday June 30, 2007 @11:52AM (#19699815)

          So it takes a soldering iron to change the battery. That's not exactly making it a challenge for most people on Slashdot, right?

          In my experience there are way too many people who shouldn't be allowed anywhere near a soldering iron.

          Put down the soldering iron and back away. That's right, back away from the soldering iron.
          • by DarkVader (121278)
            But it's a nice temp-controlled Weller. I'm not giving it up. Besides, I've not burned myself with one since I was a teenager, and I'm well over 30 now.

            Seriously, from the photos this looks like it would be about as easy as soldering gets. Opening the case without scratching it would be harder than the actual soldering.
        • by joto (134244) on Saturday June 30, 2007 @02:16PM (#19700675)

          My list of why I won't buy one now, and maybe not ever:

          Here is mine:

          1. I already have a phone
          2. My phone is not broken yet
          3. My phone doesn't look like it's going to break soon
          4. Even if I needed a new phone, I'm not convinced it would be my first choice
          5. You can't currently buy the iPhone in Norway
        • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

          by rtechie (244489)
          So it takes a soldering iron to change the battery. That's not exactly making it a challenge for most people on Slashdot, right?

          No, this is a major hassle and introduces the distinct possibility of frying the motherboard when trying to change the battery. You'll probably be able to send it off to Apple for a nominal fee (or third parties) but it's still hassle. There's also the critical issue of not being able to swap batteries if necessary. For an MP3 player, this doesn't mean much. For a critical business
        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by pimpimpim (811140)
          Removing the battery is still the best way to reboot your phone in case it gets stuck. Just tell me what to do with the iPhone. Or will it, in contrast to any electronic device in the world, never get stuck?
      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by Dun Malg (230075)

        I suppose in this light it's not really planned obsolescence. Apple just built the iPhone to the minimum specs of the fickle trendy gadget crowd.
        No, it's planned obsolescence whether the majority are going to chuck it before it dies or not. The fact remains that it was built with a short lifetime in mind, and you simply do not have the option of using it beyond that short lifetime without resorting to drastic measures.
        • by shmlco (594907)
          "... you simply do not have the option of using it beyond that short lifetime without resorting to drastic measures."

          You mean, other than taking it to an Apple store and asking them to replace the battery for you?
        • by profplump (309017)
          No, it's not, because "planned" requires intent. If they really thought that consumer interest would be the limiting factor in the life of the phone then failing to design it function longer than its expected lifetime does not show intent -- planning -- to limit that lifetime. I'm not saying that's how it happened, but you can't claim "planned obsolescence" without implying intent.

          Your tires have a shorter lifetime than most other parts in your car and aren't user-replacable -- you have to go someplace with
    • Re:What's that? (Score:4, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward on Saturday June 30, 2007 @09:23AM (#19698969)
      More planned obsolescence. Pity. I'd like to see Apple go a little greener. A non-user replaceable battery limits the life of a device substantially.

      I've had three mobile phones in my life, each of them for about 4 years. I have never replaced a battery in any of them.

      Granted, at the end of the 4 years I might need to charge them every three days instead of every five, but that's not a problem for me. And by the time I get rid of the phone it's usually because it has failed in general - broken clamshell joint or broken charger connection, for example.

      Most likely Apple has made the battery non-replacable because they have better uses for the space required for a replacable battery; and because user replacement of batteries is a fairly unusual thing.

      Just my $0.02
      • by Wdomburg (141264)
        Unusual? None of the phones I've bought (three LG, three Motorolla, one Samsung, one Sanyo, one Kyocera, one Nokia) haven't had a user replaceable battery. And in all the ones I've used personall the battery life - both talk time and idle charge - was severely diminished before two years was out, enough to warrant battery replacement in a couple cases (bad to have a work phone die in the middle of a call or to find your personal phone dead in an emergency).
    • by Joebert (946227)

      A non-user replaceable battery limits the life of a device substantially.

      I hope that battery can last 2 years, or the price of iPhones drops before the two years of everyones' contracts.
    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      by rbanffy (584143)
      When was the last time you replaced a smartphone battery?

      I had a couple, the current being a Nokia E62 I got for free from the phone company after my faithful Sony Ericsson P-800 died. My SE P-800 was my phone, PDA, camera (for emergencies, because it was a lousy one) and MP3 player for over 3 years and its battery was still strong (a single charge gave it 48 hours) the day it died the bad checksum death.

      It's been since the early 90s the last time I saw a phone whose useful life did outlast its battery.

      By t
      • yesturday. i use my pda phones so my batteries last no more than a year and then i have to recharge every 4 hours.

    • by Jeremy_Bee (1064620) on Saturday June 30, 2007 @11:51AM (#19699807)

      More planned obsolescence. Pity. I'd like to see Apple go a little greener. A non-user replaceable battery limits the life of a device substantially.
      The Apple strategy with non-replaceable batteries could actually be considered the greener option.

      I still have a pile of the various PDA's and cell phones I have had over the years. Most used undersized batteries that reduced the initial cost of the unit (even though most cost about the same as today's iPhone), but also didn't last. This required me to purchase new batteries, extra batteries, and bigger, add-on batteries and battery packs. All of these batteries are in the same pile, waiting for me to find appropriate green disposal (some day).

      I would argue that most people eventually just chuck these things away and that they end up in a landfill somewhere. Also the fact that the batteries are generally crap means that the average user goes through more batteries for a non-Apple "replaceable battery" product than they do for the Apple product.

      The fact that Apple offers a low-cost, no-hassle, battery replacement option means that the majority of iPod and now iPhone), battery replacements happen through Apple instead of the consumer, and thus the batteries all get properly recycled instead of just being dumped. The main cause of battery pollution from iPods for instance is whatever portion of the populace that does not return them to Apple for replacement or recycling and just chucks the item away when it's dead. That is the consumer's fault, not Apple's.

      The only thing that could be done better is that Apple could take back the old iPods so as to alleviate even the worst acts of the consumers of their products. They already do this in a limited way and have announced recently a goal of doing a take-back on every product they make.

      How much more green could they possibly be right now?

  • Wow (Score:5, Interesting)

    by niceone (992278) * on Saturday June 30, 2007 @08:36AM (#19698775) Journal
    Obviously you can't change the battery yourself, but from those pictures it looks like even Apple couldn't change it. That can't be so, can it?
    • Re:Wow (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Rosco P. Coltrane (209368) on Saturday June 30, 2007 @08:39AM (#19698789)
      Obviously you can't change the battery yourself, but from those pictures it looks like even Apple couldn't change it. That can't be so, can it?

      You know, I have the feeling people who buy high-tech, flashy gadgetry such as the iPhone aren't likely to invest in it for the long term, with a value-for-money approach to buying and owning the product. The battery will probably last long enough for the owner to have another "oh shiny!" purchasing moment and relegate his iPhone to the bottom of some drawer...
      • Re:Wow (Score:5, Funny)

        by suv4x4 (956391) on Saturday June 30, 2007 @09:00AM (#19698859)
        You know, I have the feeling people who buy high-tech, flashy gadgetry such as the iPhone aren't likely to invest in it for the long term, with a value-for-money approach to buying and owning the product.

        You'll be surprised. Most Mac people I know are poor, unemployed, and step on toes around their machines. But they were so convinced they should absolutely must get Apple, they would stay away from pot for a month to afford one.
        • Re:Wow (Score:4, Funny)

          by FireFury03 (653718) <slashdotNO@SPAMnexusuk.org> on Saturday June 30, 2007 @09:06AM (#19698895) Homepage
          Most Mac people I know are poor

          They probably weren't poor until they blew all their cash on Apple kit. :)
        • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

          by Gothmolly (148874)
          No, they're still using the Mac that their parents bought them when they lived in the basement. The reason that they don't have any money is that they're too busy updating their blogs, and buying emo music, thick-rimmed glasses, and 1970s Tshirts.
        • by Joebert (946227)

          they would stay away from pot for a month to afford one.

          Then after a month with no pot they look at the $500 price tag, two year contract, & wonder WTF they were thinking.

          In all fairness though, I met one of the guys who designs lighting layouts at shows for Audio Visual Innovations [aviinc.com], & he uses an Apple laptop to do it. He didn't have to give up pot for a month to get the Mac either, the Mac actually helps him afford good pot.
          • by starwed (735423)
            I know tons of people with 2 year cingular/AT&T contracts... I doubt that this is that much of a deal-breaker for most.
        • by Wdomburg (141264)
          Most Mac people I know aren't poor, and some edge into the wealthy category. On the other hand, a lot of them like to brag about the longevity of their computers. On the other other hand, most of them seem to accept a distinct lack of longevity when it comes to their iPods. I suspect that the price and the lock-in on the iPhone will make for pissed off people if the battery doesn't go the distance, though.
        • Really? Because most of the QA, Web Development, Vulnerability Signatures... hell 2/3 of engineering at my company that have given up on Windows and gone to Macs (another 1/4 use Linux) seem to be paid pretty well, at least from the cars outside the building. Maybe if you stopped smoking pot in your mom's basement long enough to get a real tech job you might see people are over windows in silicon valley, they want something that WORKS.
      • Re:Wow (Score:4, Interesting)

        by fermion (181285) on Saturday June 30, 2007 @01:25PM (#19700405) Homepage Journal
        You would be amazed at how long an Mac can last. Macs tend to be designed for power and durability, not to meet some arbitrary low price point. This means that Apple can pay suppliers for first pick parts, and not just settle for the parts that fell off the truck.

        So I have an Apple cube running a smartboard, a powerbook from around 2000 that is my home entertainment setup, a powermac from around 1998 that isn't used much but still works very well, not to mention sundry mac classics, etc, that had to go away because they were not OS X capable.

        My ipods still work, though I never was impressed with the battery life in them, nor do I like the Apple replacement policy, which is why I am hesitant about the iPhone. But the still work, compared to my Nomad, which has little plastic pieces broken off, which means that I paid about the same amount of money for a device that does not work.

        The same applies to my high price phone. Battery lasted a year, then had to charge it every day if I used it, then had to pay $50 for a new one. OTOH, a few years on, my iPod battery is still tolerable. Hopefully, like the iPod, I can send in the iPhone for a battery swap. I think the issue is not going to be the value of the phone, but the value of the time to wait to swap out the phone. If one can't be without a phone for a couple days, and I know many people, even children, who can't, then those will be the ones who will have the new phone. The rest of us, trying to get the full value out of the product, will just eventually have two phones. One for every day, and one for sunday best.

    • Re:Wow (Score:5, Informative)

      by Gord (23773) on Saturday June 30, 2007 @09:07AM (#19698901) Homepage
      Obviously you can't change the battery yourself, but from those pictures it looks like even Apple couldn't change it. That can't be so, can it?

      Apple will replace it under their service program, when the phone is out-of-warranty. $85.95 including postage.

      http://www.apple.com/support/iphone/service/batter y/ [apple.com]
      • Re:Wow (Score:4, Informative)

        by djh101010 (656795) * on Saturday June 30, 2007 @09:34AM (#19699013) Homepage Journal

        Apple will replace it under their service program, when the phone is out-of-warranty. $85.95 including postage.

        http://www.apple.com/support/iphone/service/batter y/ [apple.com]
        Oh come on now, Gord, the bashers were displaying their ignorance for us, and you had to go and spoil the little show by injecting actual facts and everything. What were you thinking?

        Another point, is that I've sent 2 iPods back to Apple for battery replacement, and both times they came back as (presumably) the same guts but a new battery, and case. So the cost (60 bucks as I recall) was in effect a refurb. Looked like a brand new unit coming back.
      • Re:Wow (Score:4, Interesting)

        by antime (739998) on Saturday June 30, 2007 @11:27AM (#19699643)

        Will the data on my iPhone be preserved?

        No, the repair process will clear all data from your iPhone.

        How much do you want to bet they're not repairing jack shit, just giving you a new phone?
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by itsdapead (734413)

      Obviously you can't change the battery yourself, but from those pictures it looks like even Apple couldn't change it. That can't be so, can it?

      Welcome to the scorched Earth.

      Lots of people habitually upgrade their phone every time they upgrade their contract - OK that's with free or heavily subsidised phones that don't cost $500 with a contract - but rest assured, those guys who queued all day yesterday are not going to be seen dead using a first-generation iPhone in two year's time. These are the custome

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by ivan256 (17499)

        Having said that, I'm sure Apple service agents will be able to replace the battery (...a purpose designed case-opening tool and a supply of replacement back covers would make it rather easier)

        From seeing the Think Secret pictures, I agree. A special tool for removing the bottom half of the back, four screws, and a soldering iron and you're in. You probably don't even have to send it back to Apple. I've seen in-store cell phone repair techs perform more complex operations than that.

        It wasn't too long ago

    • by tassii (615268)
      Far as I know if you can solder something in, you can re-heat and take it back out again. I've been doing it for years to replace worn batteries on my RC race cars. Saves space since you don't have to add connectors and increases the electric throughput since there isn't a gap for the electric to have to jump across.
    • by DarkVader (121278)
      That's not obvious at all. Those batteries will be available, and I obviously COULD change it myself.
  • The software (Score:3, Interesting)

    by yohanes (644299) on Saturday June 30, 2007 @08:37AM (#19698777) Homepage Journal
    I am more interested in someone hacking the software (is it really OSX?, can you flash it, etc). But this may provide a good start, because they give quite detailed photos of most of the hardware.
  • Snuff movie (Score:5, Funny)

    by Anonymous Coward on Saturday June 30, 2007 @08:49AM (#19698813)
    It's like some kind of warped geek snuff movie
  • SIM (Score:3, Insightful)

    by wikinerd (809585) on Saturday June 30, 2007 @08:49AM (#19698815) Journal
    Here in Europe in most cases we can change the SIM easily. Why not in the US?
    • by suv4x4 (956391)
      Here in Europe in most cases we can change the SIM easily. Why not in the US?

      I'm "here in Europe", and this is differing from country to country, and service provider to service provider. Sometimes even the same provider would offer locked and unlocked phones at the same time.

      So don't oversimplify things so much.

      As about disassembling the iPhone: bleh. I wanna see actual reviews and sales numbers.

      It's not susprise if you open it you'll see chips, batteries and TFT screen.
  • 1. Unraveling the mystery of the multi-touch screen by peeling it like an onion!
    2. Figuring out if the iPhone has vestiges of unimplemented features (like how they found unused slots on the Mac Mini).
    3. Seeing exactly which parts are from China, Taiwan and Korea.
    4. And most importantly... iPorn! (is what you get when you cause your iPhone to do an iGoatse.)
  • Mod me flamebait but I'm always interested in comparing the estimated manufacturing costs to the price tags Apple puts on its gadgets.
  • Apple iPhone Dissected
    Given the way things are going, who knows, the children of the future might end up dissecting iPhones instead of dead rats
  • by Chemisor (97276) on Saturday June 30, 2007 @09:09AM (#19698905)
    I wonder if some EE guru could answer me what might be a stupid question: what's the point of using a PCB these days instead of just putting everything on the same chip? I highly doubt that anyone would try to repair an iPhone by substituting some component. Hell, we don't even fix TVs any more. There might be some advantage to using a generic component, but once you are making a custom chip, it would seem to be no harder to merge all the others into it. With the architecture being mostly virtual, I doubt there would be any physical design revisions that could be corrected by revising the layout. So why the PCB?
    • by jamesh (87723) on Saturday June 30, 2007 @09:19AM (#19698949)
      I'm not an EE guru, and I know next to nothing about the iPhone, but very standard chips exist for lots of things like 802.11abg, GSM, CDMA, 3G, USB, Bluetooth, LCD/TFT displays, audio, battery charging and monitoring etc. Also, some of these components might be region specific. It makes some sense to keep them separate rather than try and stick everything on the same die, unless you are really pushed for space. Once the thing leaves the factory it may not be repaired, but at the assembly level they may well swap out a bad Bluetooth chip and replace it if required...

      It also allows for (eg) 802.11n ability to be added at a later date if a pin compatible 802.11abgn chip comes on the market, or for them to change display vendors (maybe requiring a different driver chip) if they need to.
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by dsanfte (443781)
      The more stuff on a chip, the lower the yields due to failures of individual components, and the more need for a heat spreader. Secondly, putting all the stuff on a chip means it has to be manufactured by a single company, so less cost-savings is to be found than from shopping around for off-the-shelves from China.

      I would also hazard a guess that some of the components on the PCB would simply not fit into an IC.

      That being said, if you really wanted to make an all-in-one-chip iPhone, it's probably possible,
    • by Thumper_SVX (239525) on Saturday June 30, 2007 @09:25AM (#19698977) Homepage
      I'm not an EE guru, but it seems to me the reason for discreet chips in a lot of these devices actually serves several purposes.

      Firstly, data speeds between chips might not match; something that's a lot easier to engineer into discreet chips than a single chip with everything on board.

      Secondly, it gives the manufacturer the freedom to switch out components at will. If you dismantle anything from a large embedded device manufacturer, you might find that a single "generation" of a product might go through several iterations of chips simply because the manufacturer was able to source chips from different chip manufacturers for better prices.

      Hell, I know I've seen a number of devices of supposedly the same generation that have had four or five iterations of motherboard and probably more of the chips themselves. Don't kid yourself; manufacturers of these devices are all about maximizing profits, and they do that by keeping their product lines "nimble"

      Third, and as an aside to the second point; fabbing a custom chip is expensive, in time, resources and cost. Most manufacturers will use off the shelf components where possible so that they can keep the costs down. Custom chips tend to be fabbed only where off the shelf solutions don't exist or fail to meet some other engineering goal. The custom chips shown in the iPhone are a prime example of this. Although we don't know for sure what's inside that ARM package (the part numbers seem incongruous), we can guess that they did combine multiple discreet components into that chip package. In the case of the iPhone this was probably done to meet the packaging requirements of the entire device; i.e. Apple wanted a slim and compact device and discreet chips may have taken more space than the engineering team wanted.

      However, the fact that there are several off the shelf chips on the board as well tells me that they were balancing cost and engineering requirements... this almost certainly took a lot of time and it's a nicely engineered solution. I look forward to version 2... which is when I might consider buying one (sorry, tethering and 3G are a big deal for me as I use them daily).
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by catwh0re (540371)
      Many reasons for keeping away from a giant mother chip vs chip division by their function:

      1. Lots of proprietary chips from lots of vendors.
      2. You lose greater economies of scale when engineering custom silicon. Instead of buying existing chips.
      3. It's often easier to contain clock speeds and single-ended capacitance within the boundaries of a chip. Extra electronics is required to buffer the effects of clock/capacitance etc from other components. (I.E. Interference.)
      4. If all the chips are together, th

    • by Bender_ (179208) on Saturday June 30, 2007 @10:58AM (#19699457) Journal

      Ignore all other replies, they are only half truth.

      The truth is: Different manufacturing processes are required depending on the function of the chips. There are many different types of integrated circuits in a cellphone: Logic (processor), analog parts (Silicon and exotic III-V semiconductors), Memory (NAND flash, NOR flash, DRAM), Sensors (think MEMS). Each of these require a different process flow. Combining those is often extremely expensive to impossible.

      The way it is usually done is to use different circuit techniques to achieve the same functionality in a silicon logic process. However in many situations this is not possible or economical, yet.

    • by Alioth (221270)
      You just can't get some things inside the chip, such as decoupling capacitors (too big), connectors (far too big, and would not be mechanically sound on the chip itself). Most chips need at least a couple of discrete components to work. You need a PCB for those.

      That's not even addressing the issue of cost of making a single ASIC that does everything the iPhone does. Making a PCB to hold a number of ICs would be cheaper.
    • by ceoyoyo (59147)
      I don't think there are any real custom chips in the iPhone. They all looked pretty standard. A couple of them have Apple logos printed on them, but I bet they're off the shelf components other than that.

      Even if you did put everything on one chip you'd still need the PCB for connectors and various support components, capacitors and resistors and such.
    • by imadork (226897)
      (Disclaimer: IAAEEG, but that doesn't mean I know what I'm talking about.)

      One other point (which I haven't seen addressed here yet) is that anytime you do anything with analog or wireless, you're probably going to want a different chip, because (generally speaking, there are always exceptions) all the things in a particular chipmaking process that make digital logic go faster make analog circuits poorer. So, having them be in different chips enables you to use the latest cutting-edge process for your digita

  • I see the iPhone uses a 667 MHz ARM processor that's able to execute Java bitecode directly. I wonder what Java performance is like on this thing?
    • by wootest (694923)
      Nonexistant, since it's not supported.

      I'm hoping Apple will open up the iPhone to third parties sooner or later, but being able to run existing Java midlets is low on their list, and probably for good reason. That's a 160dpi display. You want to aim for a 9-pixels-high checkbox using your finger on that sort of screen? It's not like Java's well-positioned for resolution independence either.

      Java apps would stick out like a sore thumb, would work entirely differently and wouldn't actually be able to take adva
  • by jc42 (318812) on Saturday June 30, 2007 @09:41AM (#19699053) Homepage Journal
    I got my first "Congratulations, you have won new iPhone" phishing message, complete with link (to http://203.121.78.200/... [203.121.78.200]) to click on and give them all my personal contact info.

    This is indeed an opportunity for all kinds of modern enterpreneurs.

    • by Nimey (114278)
      How long until we start getting idiots with "free iphone" lines in their sigs or web links?
  • by dreemkill (170748) on Saturday June 30, 2007 @10:04AM (#19699165) Homepage
    http://stream.ifixit.com/ [ifixit.com]

    they did it some time yesterday, about an hour after it came out i think.

    and by the looks of it, they didn't destroy it.
  • by nighty5 (615965) on Saturday June 30, 2007 @12:15PM (#19700009)
    "A new 3G (European) version of the iPhone will be launched Monday in the UK by Apple - in a join promotion with Vodafone, T-Mobile of Germany, and Carphone Warehouse. It should answer the disappointment with the US version of the iPhone which has been widely slammed for its poor performance as a phone."

    http://www.newswireless.net/index.cfm/article/3466 [newswireless.net]

    If this is indeed true, it will certainly be what the market needs. I am surprised the US market would tolerate paying so much for a 2G phone.

    Sounds like the US market is behind the 8 ball, with a couple of years to wait for a 3G - time will be indeed telling.

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