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Graphics Software Hardware

HDMI-Enabled Graphics Cards Debut 235

Posted by Zonk
from the no-way-things-can-go-wrong-here dept.
TrackinYeti writes "HDMI (High Definition Multimedia Interface), is the first industry supported digital-only interface, that requires a single cable to connect an output source to an HD-ready device, such as a television or monitor and deliver HD video, plus multi-channel digital audio, like Dolby Digital and DTS. Recently, Asus Computer released versions of their GeForce 7600 and Radeon X1600 cards with HDMI outputs on them, driven by an on-board Sil1930 controller. These are some of the first graphics cards to hit the market that can output HDMI natively with an integrated HDCP cipher engine and support HD-audio as well. Just the thing for that HTPC?"
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HDMI-Enabled Graphics Cards Debut

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  • by tomstdenis (446163) <tomstdenis@@@gmail...com> on Tuesday March 13, 2007 @08:43AM (#18330527) Homepage
    Wait, I still use a VGA monitor, with a higher dot pitch than most any HD TV ...

    I guess this is good for folks who build home theatres out of their computers, but then why do they need a 3D accelerator to show TV or videos?

    Tom
    • by Danathar (267989) on Tuesday March 13, 2007 @08:45AM (#18330547) Journal
      I'm building a dedicated home theater in my basement. When it's done I'd like to be able to play a videogame (shooter or driving game) in the dedicated room. VGA cables lose signal strength over distances and cause ghosting.
      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        by prefect42 (141309)
        Buy better cables. Seriously. We've run high res stereo graphics over long runs of high quality cabling (BNC connectors, 3 core (sync-on-green) nearly an inch across with all the shielding and damn heavy) and the losses aren't visible. DVI is only 15ft with standard spec cabling (although you can beat that) but HDMI should go further. Time will tell.
      • by Lumpy (12016) on Tuesday March 13, 2007 @09:31AM (#18331013) Homepage
        Funny I run them 100+ feet all the time. I even use Cat-5 cable and dont get ghosting or smearing. Maybe if you bought the right equipment for extending the signal you would not have problems.

        My longest run was 350 feet without any problems, but that was on a smallish screen, only 13 feet across.
        • You may be interested in seeing a 100 ft. DVI connection over CAT 6 cable. It was on the most recent episode [national.com] of the National Semicondcutor Analog by Design Show. [national.com]

          Sure, it's not 350 ft, but it is pure digital, and uses some cool (to me, at least,) techniques like pre-emphasis and filtering to achieve the 100 ft transmission. Also in the episode is a 15m PCIe extender! (The demos are in the last half, the discussion on how it is done is in the first half.)

      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by Darth_brooks (180756)
        Have you considered VGA over Cat-5 [svideo.com]?
      • by ObjetDart (700355)
        I have a front projector setup in my home theater room, driven by a HTPC. I've been using a 30 foot VGA cable for years. Recently I got a new 720p projector with both VGA and HDMI inputs, so after a while I bought a 30 foot DVI->HDMI cable (video card has the typical 1 VGA and 1 DVI output) and switched to that. I honestly could not tell any difference in the image quality.

        I didn't spend big bucks on cables either...both cables were in the $30-$50 range. The image looks great in both cases.

        • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

          by Ajaxamander (646536)
          What hardware do you have in your HTPC, and what OS are you using? I'm using Knoppmyth (Debian) with a GeForce3, and when I run the GeForce's DVI through a DVI->HDMI cable, (or in any way convert it to HDMI) I get this nasty red digital snow. I've tried a few different arrangements (short of spending $$$ to try other HDMI hardware,) but I can't seem to get it to go away. I assume your setup is working without issue.
          • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

            by ObjetDart (700355)
            My HTPC is a Shuttle XPC running plain ol' Windows XP with a GeForce 6600GT video card, connected to an Optoma HD70 front projector, and yes it is working without issue. I've never seen nor heard of the red snow problem you are describing...perhaps a quick search at avsforum.com in the HTPC forum, or even a post, would help? There are a lot of very knowledgeable people in that forum.
      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by sootman (158191)
        Then use high-quality cables. (Yes, Monster Cables are pretty much BS, but there is such thing as high-quality VGA cables that look good over "long" runs--and believe me, your basement isn't that long. Ask anyone who does trade shows--25' to 50' is no problem at all.) Or, put your computer close to your display.
    • by westlake (615356)
      why do they need a 3D accelerator to show TV or videos?

      Vista's Aero GUI. GPU hardware acceleration for video processing. PC gaming on the 60 inch plasma or rear projection screen.

    • by dr.badass (25287)
      Wait, I still use a VGA monitor, with a higher dot pitch than most any HD TV

      If you're trying to suggest that your VGA monitor is better, I think you mean lower dot pitch...might mean something if people sat twenty inches away from their TV.

    • by TeknoHog (164938)

      I guess this is good for folks who build home theatres out of their computers, but then why do they need a 3D accelerator to show TV or videos?

      Because, unlike dumb appliances, a computer can be used for lots of different tasks.

      Also, as the AC pointed out, just because you don't need something doesn't mean nobody else does. But kudos for the correct spelling of 'theatre' :)

  • by mulvane (692631) on Tuesday March 13, 2007 @08:45AM (#18330541)
    Great, now I can watch all the legal stuff I have valid licenses for. What about my HD rips I make from my legally owned collection for viewing among any of the tv's in my house and for safe archiving of original content?
    • Exactly (Score:5, Insightful)

      by cyclomedia (882859) on Tuesday March 13, 2007 @09:01AM (#18330673) Homepage Journal
      I'm the proud owner of a toddler, and try as i might occasionally the little bugger will without doubt get her hands on a shiny disc, perhaps accidentally left in the DVD player overnight and she chewed on the remote i accidentally left on the sofa and nibbled the eject button. anyway, you can be careful but hey, i'm only human right.

      Otherwise she might be ill and not feeling up to her usual daily routine of running around the park/garden/trashing-the-house generally so we stick on a bunch of disney/animal films and play them whilst she's chilling out on the sofa and she slyly grabs one whilst i pop the the kitchen to fetch some kiddy medicine.

      wouldnt it be nice if i could play backups of my original copies, and not have to worry if that happens.

      of course one day i'd like the ubiqutous server-under-the-stairs but in the mean time i'd rather not have to fork out another £20 quid because the only PHYSICAL COPY of the movie who's CONTENTS i purchased the RIGHTS TO WATCH got used as a teething ring.
      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by networkBoy (774728)
        AnyDVD (for disney CP) + DVD Decryptor + Auto GK.

        I store all my kids movies on a home server and stream them to an Xbox running XBMC(which can read from a simple SMB share).
        I made this decision when I had a damaged "Beauty and the Beast" disk. I wrote disney to ask what the replacement cost would be if I turned in the damaged copy and they said "buy a new copy". They are not in stores anymore and I dare you to get in a bidding war on fleabay. So I netflixed it and ripped it. Never looked back. Ripped m
        • Re:Exactly (Score:5, Insightful)

          by mrchaotica (681592) * on Tuesday March 13, 2007 @10:11AM (#18331575)

          AnyDVD (for disney CP) + DVD Decryptor + Auto GK.

          That's not the point! The point is that we shouldn't have to break the law to use the media we legally purchased!

          • I don't disagree at all with your statement.
            I simply wanted to provide initial poster with a known working solution to backing up disney DVDs which I have found to be highly problematic in most copy situations.
            AnyDVD seems to work well at the sector based protection that DVDdecryptor can't handle very well, while DVDdecryptor can rip all the wonderful stream information.
            AutoGK makes nice reasonable sized files in Xvid or Divx format that XBMC can play flawlessly. It's an end-to-end solution that actually w
          • by dr.badass (25287)
            That's not the point! The point is that we shouldn't have to break the law to use the media we legally purchased!

            If you want to make a backup (and that's what everyone says they want to do, there's no law stopping you.
          • by TheLink (130905)
            It's not illegal in my country yet. But I think the US is working hard to change that ASAP.

            Free Trade Agreements, Gene Patents, DMCA and all that crap.
      • by mgiuca (1040724)
        This is true. I think a big problem is the distinction between physical media and rights to watch.

        If you charge for physical media, and your kid wrecks it, then that's your problem (sorry). If you backed it up, then you solved your problem.

        But these days, that isn't what's happening. They think they control your rights. They don't let you back up, because it "isn't within your rights". But it's still on a physical media, which can be wrecked by your kid. Since they're so adamant that you aren't buying media
      • by hackstraw (262471)
        I'm the proud owner of a toddler, and try as i might occasionally the little bugger will without doubt get her hands on a shiny disc, perhaps accidentally left in the DVD player overnight and she chewed on the remote i accidentally left on the sofa and nibbled the eject button. anyway, you can be careful but hey, i'm only human right.

        And back on topic, toddlers (cats, dogs, vacuum cleaners, etc) are incompatable with HDMI.

        For the life of me, I don't know why this connection ever became a standard. For thos
        • by sootman (158191)
          And that fact that it carries sound is laughable too. WTF?!? Didn't we just spend 20 years being sold home theater gear and being told how the built-in speakers suck? And now the great leap forward is to use a shitty integrated cable like Apple shipped on the 6100 and abandoned over a decade ago?!?!?
          • by hackstraw (262471)
            And that fact that it carries sound is laughable too. WTF?!? Didn't we just spend 20 years being sold home theater gear and being told how the built-in speakers suck? And now the great leap forward is to use a shitty integrated cable like Apple shipped on the 6100 and abandoned over a decade ago?!?!?

            I'm not familiar with the integraded Apple cable, but the HDMI cable with integrated sound is kinda cool. How this benefits a video card on a computer, is to be determined. But with HDMI and integrated video a
    • From nvidia's HD urevideo [nvidia.com]:

      Play HD DVD and Blu-ray movies on your PC with PureVideo HD technology.

      Available on HD DVDs and Blu-ray discs, high-definition movies are bringing an exciting new video experience to PC users. NVIDIA® PureVideo(TM) HD technology lets you enjoy cinematic-quality HD DVD and Blu-ray movies with low CPU utilization and power consumption, allowing higher quality movie playback and picture clarity.

      But wait, only these cards are supported: nvidia's list of cards [nzone.com]

      But hrmmm...it

    • by Eccles (932)
      What about my HD rips I make from my legally owned collection for viewing

      What about them? They don't have DRM, so they'll display just fine. HDMI doesn't have to have HDCP.

      it wasn't quite clear to me, though, how the audio works. Ideally you would like just to send out a digital audio signal via the HDMI or separate connector, and no sound card need be involved for video file playback. Having it go via the HDMI to a device that then feeds the audio out to a separate audio system is the most convenient,
    • by donglekey (124433)
      Customers? Pirates? What's the difference?
  • Hmm (Score:5, Interesting)

    by 26199 (577806) * on Tuesday March 13, 2007 @08:46AM (#18330549) Homepage

    Whenever I read 'high definition' these days I think: great, another product that's broken by design.

    Someone wake me up when they've passed that part...

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by tompatman (936656)
      I don't understand why this comment is moderated insightful. If you don't like the DRM thrown on top of HD content and choose not to use any of it because of that, that is your choice, but do you think they will invent a new DRM free standard when this standard has already caught on? It's here to stay and you will have to go out of your way to avoid it in another couple of years. From what I can tell, it's not broken by design since the cable/satellite companies are making plenty of $$ by delivering HD cont
  • Why HD? (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Paulrothrock (685079) on Tuesday March 13, 2007 @08:55AM (#18330623) Homepage Journal

    I would rather the studios get cracking on some good content rather than having us watch the same, boring, stale content in OMG U CAN SEE THER POREZORS!1!!one! I get more entertainment value out of my free podcasts than out of my television. The content is stuff I actually care about, and while the production value isn't always the greatest it's almost always worth the price of bandwidth. And I can watch or listen to them at work.

    And the worst part is that when the studios make good content, it's canceled or sunk very quickly. Most people have probably never heard of Idiocracy, but everyone I've heard who's seen it says it's awesome, but it only ran for one weekend in 8 theaters because some exec got scared because it made fun of all the idiots of the world. And then there's Firefly, and Dr. Who, and Torchwood, which got shown out of order and canceled, butchered unrecognizably to add commercials, and completely ignored respectively.

    To put it another way: I don't see any reason I should upgrade to HD just so I can get the MPAA regulating what I watch or be able to see the blades of grass on the field where millionaires in tights jump on each other.

    • Low budget filmmaking is no more expensive in HD than SD.
      HD cameras and equipment are available to most filmmakers currently using SD.
      HD Digital cinemas [broadway.org.uk] are not just exotic rarities.

      Lots of material is currently being gathered in HD and dropped down, particularly sport.

      An HDMI enabled video card is *exactly* what some have been waiting for. Now we can preview our work on a TV screen, which has a different colour space to computer monitors.

      So, in summary, quit yer bitchin' cos you're talking out yer arse
      • by Paulrothrock (685079) on Tuesday March 13, 2007 @09:13AM (#18330821) Homepage Journal

        That's all well and good, but if the content is going to be bad, no amount of high definition will fix it.

      • While others have been waiting for a format that wasn't crippled in the first place.
      • by Criffer (842645)

        An HDMI enabled video card is *exactly* what some have been waiting for. Now we can preview our work on a TV screen, which has a different colour space to computer monitors.

        Actually, no. If you really wanted digital video on a TV screen you'd be using HD-SDI (with embedded AES audio). You can get some nice cards from Bluefish [bluefish444.com].

        HDMI is a useless specification. It does nothing not already done by HD-SDI (and over co-ax, the cheapest possible cabling!), except for the Digital Compatibility Prevention.

      • by sootman (158191)
        > An HDMI enabled video card is *exactly* what some have been waiting for.
        > Now we can preview our work on a TV screen, which has a different colour
        > space to computer monitors

        Wouldn't a DVI to HDMI converter [google.com] work?
        • No, actually it won't. That is, it won't transmit both audio and video across the HDMI cable. The audio is not just a few extra pins, but is interleaved with the data. I was hoping for a DVI/RL->HDMI dongle about a year ago and after reading the spec realized that such a beast doesn't really exist (or could exist without fairly extensive (& expensive) processing.
      • by drinkypoo (153816)
        JVC recently brought out what they claim is the first consumer-level camcorder that does full HD. It's ~$1700 MSRP. Not bad for 3CCD and a 60GB hard disk.
        • the first part is the first
          3CCD full hd camera..

          other consumer full hd cameras exist, (I own one) this is the first one with 3 sensors which some feel gives a superior recording.
      • You know that DVI and HDMI are electrically compatible for the digital video signal, right? They were made that way on purpose. You can get a cable that goes straight from DVI to HDMI, or a cheap adapter that changes one to the other. Yes, DVI supports HDCP too. The main difference is support for analogue video (in the case of DVI) and digital audio (in the case of HDMI). So if you want to hook your DVI video card in to your HDMI TV, do it. Just get a cable, Monoprice has them cheap. No voodoo needed.
      • > Low budget filmmaking is no more expensive in HD than SD.

        Wrong.

        Maybe the electronics and media aren't significantly more expensive, but those aren't where the real expenses are. Back in the old pre-HD days Hollywood was griping about upcoming HD, because of the secondary implications.

        Makeup needs to be more carefully done. As someone else mentioned, every pore in the skin, and that includes every bit of makeup, including flaws. The makeup lines at the edges of the Klingon forehead that didn't show on S
    • by danpsmith (922127) on Tuesday March 13, 2007 @09:22AM (#18330889)

      And the worst part is that when the studios make good content, it's canceled or sunk very quickly. Most people have probably never heard of Idiocracy, but everyone I've heard who's seen it says it's awesome, but it only ran for one weekend in 8 theaters because some exec got scared because it made fun of all the idiots of the world. And then there's Firefly, and Dr. Who, and Torchwood, which got shown out of order and canceled, butchered unrecognizably to add commercials, and completely ignored respectively.

      Dear Consumer,

      We appreciate you voicing your concerns on this pressing matter and are glad that you choose us for your entertainment purposes. It's people like you that make mass media what it is and we thank you. Unfortunately, many of the shows and movies you listed were not watched by a lot of people so we had to cancel them. The problem is that we need one billion dollars in ad revenue instead of the mere millions that a company would receive by airing quality entertainment and not pandering to ratings. (I mean, who, these days, can afford to run a company on the millions?). You mentioned an interest in the movie and/or television program "Idiocracy," I'm glad to inform you that on the violence channel, one of our best hits "Ow! My Balls" is entering it's 25th season with no end in sight. Perhaps if you enjoyed some of our other quality entertainment, you will find this enticing.

      P.S. Don't you dare use other internet media outlets for your entertainment purposes or we will consider you a pirate and sue you for living. And if you don't buy/see our movies we will consider this profit loss due to the aforementioned piracy.

      Yours Truly,

      The Mass Media Overlords

    • by stubear (130454)
      "And the worst part is that when the studios make good content I like, it's canceled or sunk very quickly."

      There, fixed that for you. Or did you honestly think you are so important that your opinion of a very subjectve medium is the only one that matters?
      • It's more than just my opinion. The vast majority of content these days is geared towards the lowest common denominator and the lowest cost. Rather than taking risks and respecting their audience, they've decided that we're all morons and that we'll take what they're feeding us. There are a few shows and movies that do make it through, but they're few and very far between.

        This is why I've gone to other, possibly illegal, ways of getting content that appeals to me. And I know I'm not the only one.

        • by stupid_is (716292)

          they've decided that we're all morons and that we'll take what they're feeding us
          You'll never go broke underestimating the intelligence of the American people [wikiquote.org]
        • by stubear (130454)
          If it's not just your opinion then you have actual facts top back up your claims then? *taps foot, patiently waiting* That's what I thought. Another slashbot talking straight out of their ass. Just admit that you want shit for free and you want the developers of the shows you like to "be cool" with this and you'll "like them and stuff" or some such bullshit.
          • I'm perfectly willing and able to pay for content. If I were able to get Dr. Who legally in the US in its original form in a short time frame, I'd gladly pay for it. There's really no reason for me not to be able to, other than antiquated distribution rights. I'm sure the BBC would love to be able to sell these things directly to me as they're produced.

            As for actual facts, they're blatantly visible. The huge glut of reality TV shows, the masses of idiotic sitcoms, the shows about aliens and Nostradamus tha

        • they've decided that we're all morons and that we'll take what they're feeding us.

          Not that I disagree with your point or anything, but its not their decision, it's their (arguably accurate) observation and most profitable means of continuing their business.

          Why spend millions an episode for some high end well written scifi that 5% of the market will love and 95% won't like when you can spend a few hundred thousand at best a season on some reality tv show that 60-70% of the market will watch?*

          It's just not c

  • Is this anything but a sales gimmick really? I mean, you can already get cards with DVI and HDCP which means you just need a DVI to HDMI cable to connect it to a TV anyway. So now they hope to sell more of these because people who have bought a HDTV might already know the HDMI name and think they need that? Well, i guess the one benefit i can see is that you can save the audio cable, but personally i don't want the audio to go to the TV anyway.
  • Bad Marketing (Score:2, Insightful)

    by BennyB2k4 (799512)
    Why aren't these cards passively cooled? They're a generation old anyways. If they're marketing it for HTPC, then they missed a big selling feature.
    • by nxtw (866177)
      I get by with my HTPC with a Intel GMA 900 and a Pentium M 760 (2.0GHz). The entire system when idle uses anywhere from 25% to 150% less power than a mid to upper level video card alone. It's played everything I've thrown at it so far; the most advanced thing has been a BBC 1080p H264 demo video. I imagine that it should handle MPEG2 and VC-1 1080p HD-DVD and Blu-ray just fine; not so sure about H264.
  • by vivaoporto (1064484) on Tuesday March 13, 2007 @09:10AM (#18330781)
    Yet another step towards "trusted" (treacherous) computing [gnu.org]. A small part of the article:

    Who should your computer take its orders from? Most people think their computers should obey them, not obey someone else. With a plan they call "trusted computing", large media corporations (including the movie companies and record companies), together with computer companies such as Microsoft and Intel, are planning to make your computer obey them instead of you. (...)

    Proprietary software means, fundamentally, that you don't control what it does;(...) It's not surprising that clever businessmen find ways to use their control to put you at a disadvantage.(...) These malicious features are often secret, but even once you know about them it is hard to remove them, since you don't have the source code.

    In the past, these were isolated incidents. "Trusted computing" would make it pervasive. "Treacherous computing" is a more appropriate name, because the plan is designed to make sure your computer will systematically disobey you. In fact, it is designed to stop your computer from functioning as a general-purpose computer. Every operation may require explicit permission.

    The technical idea underlying treacherous computing is that the computer includes a digital encryption and signature device, and the keys are kept secret from you. Proprietary programs will use this device to control which other programs you can run, which documents or data you can access, and what programs you can pass them to. These programs will continually download new authorization rules through the Internet, and impose those rules automatically on your work. If you don't allow your computer to obtain the new rules periodically from the Internet, some capabilities will automatically cease to function.


    Read the rest in the above linked article. It is an interesting reading, even for the ones familiar with it, as we march slowly and steady to the worst case scenario predicted there.
  • What's the deal? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by iolaus (704845) on Tuesday March 13, 2007 @09:21AM (#18330885) Homepage
    Man, Looks like all the posts so far are gripes! I for one am really excited about this. I've been waiting for a next-gen video card I can use in my HTPC. Not only will the 7600GT based card be able to handle decoding HD video (see articles regarding new Blu-Ray/HD-DVD backup ability) but it will also be able to transmit 8 channels of full quality digital sound. And all this with only one cable to go from my PC to my receiver. Finally, this opens up the possibility of using Vista's new digital room correction capabilities without having to do a digital-to-analog conversion on the PC just to get the processed sound to your receiver. All good things in my book.
  • by Lumpy (12016) on Tuesday March 13, 2007 @09:27AM (#18330955) Homepage
    I have been using el-cheapo Geforce 7600 cards with HDMI on them for making HTPC boxes for 5-6 months now. the cheap MSI card is our current favorite.

    Why does the article and summary act like they just hit the market?

    They really are only useful for HTPC's connected to HD tv sets.
    • by nxtw (866177)
      and when someone, for whatever reason, wants audio to go over the HDMI cable. This would be useful if someone has a receiver that supports HDMI and has no authentication problems with HDCP, but if your receiver only has optical/coaxial input, you're going to have to have another cable going from TV to the receiver. In the case of my HDTV, the TV doesn't have any sort of digital sound output, so you'd only get 2-channel analog when using sound over HDMI.

      I think the subset of people that actually use a TV's
  • by cf18 (943501) on Tuesday March 13, 2007 @09:41AM (#18331135)
    Sigh... All the new features, untested. Do the audio passthrough work? Any audio lag? Do this whole HDCP bullshit actually works and let you play your HD-DVD through PC to your HDMI+HDCP TV? Can it scale anything to 1080P properly?

    Instead they go through another boring loop of 3D benchmarks. I hate these two-bit hardware sites that only knows how to overclock and run benchmarks.
  • by Dachannien (617929) on Tuesday March 13, 2007 @09:49AM (#18331257)
    This card might be great if you never watch Plain Old Cable Television. But who bothers with a HTPC that can't record TV as well?

    We're still waiting for CableLabs to stop fellating the movie industry and license someone to make a PCI-based CableCard reader. I mean, I'd subscribe to digital cable service today, if I could tune it and record it on my PVR PC without needing to tape an IR emitter to the front of a set-top tuner.

    Their loss, I suppose.

    • by bogie (31020)
      Unfortunately not going to ever happen in a billion years. Feel free to blame MS on this one as they could have and should have made this happen.
      • by nxtw (866177)
        Actually I've heard that the people behind CableCard have strict requirements and testing for CableCard devices. The entire device needs to be certified; which means in the case of a computer, the entire system needs to be certified.

        Perhaps there will someday be a market for black-market CableCard tuners from retail HTPCs.
    • Although PCI based CableCard readers aren't readily available, you can still avoid the IR emitter and get a full digital feed from many set top boxes using IEEE 1394 (Firewire). See the MythTV Firewire [mythtv.org] page. The FCC requires that all U.S. cable providers offer a box with a Firewire interface to any customer with an HD subscription who requests one.
      • by nxtw (866177)
        And thanks to 5C, you can't get every channel. They do have to provide Firewire, and they usually do, but often times lots of content is protected with 5C. 5C basically sets a code that defines what you can do with a given set of content (copy freely, copy once, no copies, etc.) With a D-VHS (digital VHS) HDTV recorder, you will be able to record copy freely and copy once material.

        On my Time Warner cable system, all the channels that are copy freely are available freely, either via unencrypted digital ca
  • I would much rather have a DVI connectors on my graphics card than HDMI.

    HDMI = single data link with HDCP
    DVI = single data link with HDCP + dual data link for very hi res screens + Analogue

    With the use of DVI to VGA adaptors and DVI to HDMI cables you get the most flexibility.
    My Nvidia 7950GT card has DVI and HDCP for quite a while. A $10 cable gives me HDMI output...
    • I'm going to correct you assertions:

      HDMI = video and audio data link with HDCP for consumer television sets
      DVI = single data link with HDCP or dual data link for very hi res screens without audio for computer monitors.

      There's a big difference there - HDMI is for TVs, which max out as single link data rates. You can keep your DVI for that 30" Apple Studio monitor, but you underestimate the utility of having the audio in a single cable. The only reason to buy these cards is for HTPCs and the like. And its a n
  • If you really care about stopping DRM, then DO NOT BUY THESE CARDS! HDCP is DRM at its worst and will not let you show certain content on non-HDCP enable devices. So, if you really do care about DRM and stopping it, and all, then DO NOT BUY THESE CARDS! Show them that we, the customer, do not want DRM.
    • Basically all new graphics cards support HDCP. Remember, it works just fine over DVI. The video part of DVI and HDMI, at least teh older standards, are 100% compatible to the point you can get a cable that goes from one to the other. Since it isn't expensive to add, graphics card companies are doing it these days.

      Now it doesn't affect you at all unless you choose to try and use DRM'd media. HDCP isn't required when you are playing games or anything. It's no an evil DRM gremlin that tries to fuck you over.

      So
      • The fact that everyone just up and built HDCP into their devices, and now virtually none come without it, screams collusion.

        of course since when has carte blach violation of antitrust laws actually brought about enforcement
    • by pclminion (145572)

      Oh get the hell over it. How about this:

      "If you really care about stopping DRM, then DO NOT BUY DVDs! CSS is DRM at its worst and will not let you rip your DVD content to watch on your computer. So, if you really do care about DRM and stopping it, then DO NOT BUY DVDs! Show them that we, the customer, do not want DRM."

      Get real. CSS was cracked, and HDCP will be cracked. If the DMCA impedes you because you feel some weird moral obligation to follow a completely bullshit law, that could never be enforced

  • How long can HDMI cables be?

    I would love to see a standard that would allow 100 ft cables for both video & USB. This would make it easy to move a loud computer into a different room, and you could hook up a DVD drive via local USB.
  • by plasmacutter (901737) on Tuesday March 13, 2007 @01:45PM (#18335487)
    I remember reading up on the requirements for "HD Ready" tags 2 years ago on the eff homepage.

    there were so many drm requirements for that trademark cert it made my head spin.

    I decided then and there i would never buy anything marked "HD Ready"

    I fully expect linux drivers for these cards to be DMCA'd to death, if the hardware based lockdown even allows the development of linux drivers (you probably have to reverse engineer the handshake.. then get hit with the DMCA bat).

    then there's the fact that cablcard cant be read in these cards... making them completely useless for real pvr's.

    as for the previous poster mentioning HD-DVD and BLU-RAY backup utility, atm it's in its most primitive states. they are still in development(theyre still reverse engineering the final 40% of the process) and far from layman usable. There is still a distinct possibility that, despite having a system worked out to repeatedly and relatively trivially crack AACS, that the number of updatable points will make it impossible for a dvd-decrypter style 1 click app (i see it requiring as much skill as proper use of avisynth for the next 1 to 1.5 years at the latest.

Facts are stubborn, but statistics are more pliable.

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