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Handhelds Media Television Hardware

Samsung Puts Satellite TV in Cell Phones 142

Posted by michael
from the tv-is-everywhere dept.
prostoalex writes "Japanese subscribers will be able to get 70 television channels with a new cell phone, currently developed and tested by Samsung. Using an ARM microprocessor, Samsung makes it possible to receive satellite TV transmissions in 2.6 GHz range. No dish is required, however, for clarity of the signal the company is currently installing a network of repeaters. This could substantially increase the number of satellite TV subscribers, which in the United States is still a distant second to cable television."
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Samsung Puts Satellite TV in Cell Phones

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  • Re:# of channels (Score:1, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Saturday February 07, 2004 @06:21AM (#8210733)
    depends....

    My local cable tv advertises over 200 channels... only 20-30 are of any use... {with about 20-30 remaining being "Local Access" )

    ~GoAT~
  • UK TV License Nazis (Score:3, Informative)

    by skinfitz (564041) on Saturday February 07, 2004 @06:23AM (#8210736) Journal
    If this ever makes it to the UK, due to the TV Licensing Nazis - if, say, every member of a household had one of these phones and used them while out of the house, a seperate TV license costing around $160 a year would be needed for each phone.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday February 07, 2004 @06:28AM (#8210751)
    Not true. You don't need a license for battery operated TVs in the UK, mobiles would come under this.
  • by korielgraculus (591914) on Saturday February 07, 2004 @06:31AM (#8210756)
    Taken straight from TV licensing web site:

    ** A TV set powered by its own internal batteries - a pocket sized TV for example - may be covered by a licence at your home address.

  • by skinfitz (564041) on Saturday February 07, 2004 @06:31AM (#8210758) Journal
    Not true. You don't need a license for battery operated TVs in the UK, mobiles would come under this.

    You are mistaken. The letter of the law is

    "If you use or install television receiving equipment to receive or record television programme services you are required by law to have a valid TV Licence."

    This covers ANY and ALL equipment capable of receiving television signals that originate from the UK. This includes ANY form of TV receiver including computer graphics cards and VCR's.

    If battery televisions were exempt, do you not think that people would simply purchase a battery receiver and plug it into a larger monitor?
  • by skinfitz (564041) on Saturday February 07, 2004 @06:34AM (#8210765) Journal
    aken straight from TV licensing web site:

    ** A TV set powered by its own internal batteries - a pocket sized TV for example - may be covered by a licence at your home address.


    That is correct. Notice the use of the word "may". The "may" would apply IF no other TV was being used in your house while you were using the portable. This is why it is ok to have a (perhaps battery operated) TV in a holiday caravan, so long as your TV back home is not being used. It's like seat licensing for software.

    If a TV receiving phone were used out of the house while the home TV were in use, you could be fined. (Catching you is another matter entirely however).
  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday February 07, 2004 @06:35AM (#8210768)
    NEC's model can receive terrestrial VHF TV transmisions.

    Samsung's model can receive satellite television.

    There is an enormous difference.
  • Wait a while (Score:4, Informative)

    by nic barajas (750051) on Saturday February 07, 2004 @06:40AM (#8210777)
    A vital step towards realizing the service -- the successful launch of the satellite that will carry the programming -- has yet to be made.

    Looks like we won't be seeing this for a few years, at least.
  • by DrXym (126579) on Saturday February 07, 2004 @06:46AM (#8210787)
    No it wouldn't, because the TV licence doesn't cover devices solely operated by batteries (which I presume would cover phones if the charger disabled TV service). But I wouldn't worry, because Sky (satellite) would charge you 300 to watch their stations through it and inflict as much advertising on to you as UK broadcast standards permit.
  • by skinfitz (564041) on Saturday February 07, 2004 @06:49AM (#8210797) Journal
    ...actually my parent post is not strictly accurate. The cost of a UK license is 121UKP a year which right now is $221.83, not $160 as originally stated.
  • Satellite design? (Score:5, Informative)

    by dtmos (447842) on Saturday February 07, 2004 @07:25AM (#8210873)

    The handset design is one thing, but I'd really like to see the design of the satellite.

    Since the article discusses the use of a single satellite, for use by Korea and Japan only, one concludes that the satellite must be in geosynchronous orbit (otherwise there would be service outages as it passed behind the earth). That puts it 22,300 miles up (in the Clarke Belt [spacetoday.org]).

    Since the Clarke Belt is so far away, a combination of

    high transmitter power in the satellite,

    good sensitivity (low noise figure) in the receiver back on Earth, and

    high antenna gain at both transmitter and receiver

    are typically used to make the link work. Modern satellite television (e.g., DirecTV) uses a relatively high frequency of operation (12 GHz) so that high antenna gain can be achieved in a physically small (i.e., less than two foot diameter) package. However, the article says that the proposed system operates at 2.6 GHz. This would seriously kill any hope of significant antenna gain at the receiver, even if one could design a gain antenna that could track a satellite in a mobile, handheld system.

    Said another way, in the DirecTV system, the typical Earthside antenna [lashen.com] has a gain of about 33.5 dBi. The handheld antenna gain will be doing well to reach 0 dBi. Since the DirecTV receiver has a noise figure of only 1 dB, no receiver sensitivity improvement is possible there. The only way to get back the 33.5 dB of link margin is to either increase the satellite's antenna gain by an additional 33.5 dB (which would make it impractically large, especially given the low frequency of operation, and give it a very small footprint on the Earth's surface) or increase the transmitter power by 33.5 dB (or 2239x).

    How is the system to work?? Does anyone have a link margin calculation for this system?

  • Re:Oh lord... (Score:4, Informative)

    by bugbread (599172) on Saturday February 07, 2004 @07:38AM (#8210893)

    No, you can do that already with the NEC V601N [vodafone.jp]. The difference is, the V601N just picks up normal VHF / UHF stations, not satellite.
  • by Threni (635302) on Saturday February 07, 2004 @08:23AM (#8210967)
    > My personal issue with them is that they simply don't believe you when you say you
    > don't watch TV. I legally do not need a TV License however I get constantly bombarded
    > with threatening sounding letters and people coming to the house "for a look around".

    You don't need a tv license, and you don't need to let them in. You don't even need to let the police in unless they have a search warrant. You might want to type up a little note explaining your rights and send it back with whatever crap they send you when they're hassling you!
  • by TheRaven64 (641858) on Saturday February 07, 2004 @08:36AM (#8210983) Journal
    Apparently there's a clause in EU law which prohibits a government from taxing information dissemination (or something similar). It's not yet known whether this actually covers the TV license, since there has not yet been a test case. Someone I know quoted this passage at the TV license people when they were asked to renew, and never heard from them again. It seems that they are not very keen to bring a test case, since if they lose it would mean that no one would pay a TV license again.
  • Re:Interesting... (Score:2, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Saturday February 07, 2004 @10:31AM (#8211316)
    Already available in Europe. I don't know what chipsets the current phones are using but I have a devkit on my desk for a vector chipset capable of 2000Mip at 50mW power consumption. It handles realtime bidirectional MPEG4 rather easily and will be showing up in phones soon.

    Too NDA'd to give more details :(
  • Re:Interesting... (Score:2, Informative)

    by dadman (576569) on Saturday February 07, 2004 @12:23PM (#8211793)
    3G services offered by Hutchison in Europe, Australia and Hong Kong can offer 3G phone to/from NetMeeting. So there isn't exactly nobody to call :-)

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