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Re: Daylight Saving Time, I would most like

Displaying poll results.
... to see it ended, full stop.
  19108 votes / 74%
... to extend its duration.
  1555 votes / 6%
... to shorten its duration.
  343 votes / 1%
... to keep it as is.
  2106 votes / 8%
Doesn't matter; I just ignore it anyhow.
  2382 votes / 9%
25494 total votes.
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  • Don't complain about lack of options. You've got to pick a few when you do multiple choice. Those are the breaks.
  • Feel free to suggest poll ideas if you're feeling creative. I'd strongly suggest reading the past polls first.
  • This whole thing is wildly inaccurate. Rounding errors, ballot stuffers, dynamic IPs, firewalls. If you're using these numbers to do anything important, you're insane.
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Re: Daylight Saving Time, I would most like

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  • by dkleinsc (563838) on Sunday November 03, 2013 @11:31AM (#45317577) Homepage

    The reason for it nowadays basically amounts to this: If it's light out when most people get home from work, they're more likely to go shopping.

  • by PPH (736903) on Sunday November 03, 2013 @12:44PM (#45318055)

    9-5, 8-4, whatever.

    When I was at Boeing, my boss let me work 6 to 2:30 (lunch break was on my own time). Then, I got a new boss. He literally could not figure out that I wasn't skipping out early. Must have failed "big hand, little hand" in elementary school.

    This sort of mental midget was one reason I left. And now one reason Chicago HQ is moving engineering out of Seattle.

  • by tverbeek (457094) on Sunday November 03, 2013 @06:13PM (#45320283) Homepage

    If it's light out when most people get home from work, they're more likely to go shopping.

    So do it year-'round.

    In one fell swoop: all the hassles, the confusion, the circadian disruption, the traffic hazards, and the annoying small-talk related to the twice-a-year time changes go away.

  • Re:Noon (Score:4, Informative)

    by camperdave (969942) on Sunday November 03, 2013 @10:33PM (#45321821) Journal

    Set it so that noon is when the sun is at it's apex and be done with it.

    That would require daily adjustments to practically every clock on the planet. The Earth's orbit isn't a perfect circle, so Noon tomorrow isn't 24hrs from Noon today. In fact, apparent solar time (what a sundial would show) can differ from mean solar time (keeping Noon times exactly 24 hrs apart) by as much as sixteen and a half minutes. Perhaps you've seen that lopsided figure eight that they print on globes? It's called an analemma [wikipedia.org] and it shows how much we'd have to adjust the clocks each day if we followed your scheme.

  • by Bob_Who (926234) <Bob@wUMLAUTho.net minus punct> on Monday November 04, 2013 @09:19AM (#45324291) Homepage Journal

    As it is, during the winter there is a period where I leave for work while it's dark and return home afterward in the dark. To have at least a little daylight left at the end of my workday would be nice.

    Move further from the poles...daylight duration varies with the longitude, most of all.

  • by multimediavt (965608) on Tuesday November 05, 2013 @09:48PM (#45341807)

    Absolutely no reason exists why we couldn't use sunset-at-7pm as the solar set-point, rather than noon. Absolutely no reason exists why we couldn't use dawn-at-7am as the solar-set-point, rather than noon.

    Completely wrong. There's a very excellent reason to use noon. From noon to noon is always 24 hours, no matter what time of year it is. From dawn to dawn is *not* always 24 hours. From sunset to sunset is *not* always 24 hours. It varies throughout the year. This makes anything other than noon completely unsuitable as a set-point.

    Not "Insightful". He's completely correct as he states what times would be "sunset at" or "dawn at", as you use "noon" for 12:00 PM he used 7:00 PM and 7:00 AM respectively. Although, he did mix conventions; dawn and dusk, sunrise and sunset.

  • by camperdave (969942) on Wednesday November 06, 2013 @12:45AM (#45342603) Journal

    From noon to noon is always 24 hours, no matter what time of year it is.

    Sorry, but the Earth's orbit isn't a circle, and that means that the noon-to-noon time actually does vary day by day over the year; by as much as 16+ minutes.

New systems generate new problems.

 



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